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> Where I live, Some interesting facts.
Alan Wood
post Nov 21 2002, 02:42 AM
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I live in a suberb of Perth, Western Australia called Kelmscott.
Kelmscott is 24kms south of Perth city.

Perth lies on the south west coast about 3kms inland on the river Swan.

Western Australia is 2,500kms, app, north to south and 1,700kms, app, east to west.
It has a population of around 1.6million of which 1.2million live in and around Perth.
The population of Australia is about 20million.

Our nearest capital city is Adelaide, the capital of South Australia which is 2,250kms away.
Perth is arguably the most isolated capital city on earth.

WA is about one third of the Australian continent and is rich in ore, minerals,grain and livestock all of which are also exported.

The weather is normally hot and dry during the summer months (over Xmas) and temps can go as high as 43DegC for days on end.
During the winter months it rains heavily but temps always stay above freezing.
Water is our most precious resource.

I hope this gives some Idea of WA.

Regards..........Alan
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AuthorMusician
post Mar 17 2003, 11:41 PM
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Cyan,

You'll be back up here. I remember the curse some old-time Native American leader made on Boulder Canyon. The curse was that once you came to the mountains (around there), you will DIE!

Well, what really happens is that you fall in love and come back at some point to live out the rest of your life. But only if you've truly fallen in love.

Not a bad curse, if you ask me.

BTW, just a small point--Winter Park is quite a ways away from Woodland Park. However, I love that part of the country too! Lots of snow in the winter, usually wetter in the spring/summer.

I understand the shock of urban noise on the sensative ears of those of us who grew up closer to nature. The reverse is often true too--the quiet of nature often upsets urban dwellers! Huh, go figure.

Pine sure is pretty. I'll have to check out the graveyard next time we go that way to Denver. Lydia and I both like to walk around old gravestones and speculate on the lives that were lived.

Yes, the stars! There's too much light pollution here to get a good gander, but you don't have to go far to get it. We have a special place on the edge of South Park for star gazing. That's another possibility for spending our really old age--when the legs give out.

You're wise to find the urban nature areas. Every urban place I've lived--even in Virginia near DC, there was a little patch of paradise. Having those help we who have been displaced to make it through. Hug a tree for me and I'll do the same for you flowers.gif
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Cyan
post Mar 17 2003, 11:52 PM
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QUOTE
BTW, just a small point--Winter Park is quite a ways away from Woodland Park. However, I love that part of the country too! Lots of snow in the winter, usually wetter in the spring/summer.


Actually, I meant to type Woodland Park, but I must have had my wires crossed or something...not at all uncommon tongue.gif

QUOTE
Yes, the stars! There's too much light pollution here to get a good gander, but you don't have to go far to get it. We have a special place on the edge of South Park for star gazing. That's another possibility for spending our really old age--when the legs give out.


South Park is absolutely stunning. I would love to live there, too. smile.gif

QUOTE
Hug a tree for me and I'll do the same for you.


Consider it done. biggrin.gif flowers.gif
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Eeyore
post Mar 18 2003, 03:45 AM
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After an long winter the Nashville area is finally erupting in Spring right now. I sat out in the yard watching my kids frolic outside and my daffodils bloom this weekend. Now the pear trees are bursting out in white flowers all over town soon to make it seem like a spring snow when the petals fall to the ground. It is about darn time dagnabit.
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quarkhead
post Mar 18 2003, 06:22 AM
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Here in Neah Bay, spring means it's fishing time again. About a week ago we had the pre-season 48 hour halibut opener. My buddy's boat came in with 14,000 pounds. I've got a couple of nice halibut in my freezer now! They'll be out again soon for cod, and then halibut season will be upon us. Autumn is my favorite season here, as I am a river fisher. Can't wait for those King salmon to start running up the rivers! There is nothing like hooking a 35 pound king salmon on a rod, standing on the banks of the Sooes river as the sun rises! Nothing!
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Artemise
post Apr 20 2003, 05:39 AM
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Heres a new place, Anchorage, Alaska. The city has 250,000 people, which is half the population of the entire state. Right now we have sunlight until 10pm to escalate to 23 hrs by mid June, then we get a pinkish dusk at 2am and the day starts all over at about 3am.

Life in Alaska is all about wildlife and harsh conditions. Bears are around within 15 min of the city and have been known to be seen downtown, Eagles are about 3 ft high and strong and can take your cat away as a meal. The most common anomaly in Anchorage is our Moose population which can be found in any part of the city, crossing 4 lane streets, at the airport terminal, trying to get in! or on your front lawn. They are dangerous, so you have to be really careful, they will kick you to death.

The mountain range is visable from everywhere in the city, the ocean is 10 minutes away. Its too cold to ever swim in, but there is kayaking among the glaciers leading into the ocean.
Theres lots of hikes and bike trails, CC skiing, snowmobiling and snowshoeing, fairs and cultural events, like the Iditarod.

Everyone fishes and we get subsistance fishing which means every alaskan resident can go out and get lots of fish to keep you through the winter, chum fish for your dogs too. You have never seen so many salmon as when they come into the rivers to spawn. You can fish next to bears, who dont care about humans when the salmon run.

There are plenty of big mosquitos. Summer is manic and people are out too long and too late, its all outdoor life because of the long days and adjunct, the long winter nights. Winter is quiet and lazy and moody, but this winter was warm with little snow. You sleep alot, just like a bear.

I think that many people have the wrong idea about Alaska. Its not so bad. If you love the outdoors and incredible beauty, and you can sacrifce sophistication for simpler pleasures, attune your body with nature, its a great place to live.
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Rancid Uncle
post Jun 10 2003, 07:09 PM
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Tucson... I live near the La Paloma resort (which means the Dove) but I can't see any golf courses out my window. Tucson can be really hot 108-110 during the summer but it usually is around 100 or 102 because of the elevation. The biggest, most important thing is Tucson is the University of Arizona that is located "Downtown" which is south of me. I live in the Foothills of the Santa Catalina Mountains which can provide some relief from the Summer weather if you can stand being in a place called Summerhaven that has no beach. Another thing Tucson has is Cacti. Tucson is known for its Saguaro Cacti which are the tall ones with the two big arms. Some people have the misconception that the desert is just one big sand dune thing with a bunch of cacti but the truth is much of the Desert looks like this. Pehaps the best feature of Tucson is the (non-summer) weather. It stays 70-80 for much of the year and we don't have Iraqi style dust storms!
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Billy Jean
post Jun 16 2003, 04:24 PM
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I live in Athens Georgia, home of UGA Bulldogs and REM! theres lots of old antebellum homes and the down town scence is very eclectic. Great local music, very liberal and also very conservative, it's an interesting mix. Downtown is like a scaled down Seatl\Sanfransisco dropped into the old south! biggrin.gif
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Jaime
post Jun 16 2003, 04:31 PM
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QUOTE(Billy Jean @ Jun 16 2003, 12:24 PM)
I live in Athens Georgia, home of UGA Bulldogs and REM!  theres lots of old antebellum homes and the down town scence is very eclectic.  Great local music, very liberal and also very conservative, it's an interesting mix.  Downtown is like a scaled down Seatl\Sanfransisco dropped into the old south! biggrin.gif

I hear Athens is beautiful, Billy Jean. I haven't had the fortune of getting up there yet but I hope to soon.

We sure do have a lot of SouthEastern US members here lately biggrin.gif
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Ultimatejoe
post Jun 16 2003, 06:49 PM
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My home (Toronto) has the only genuine Castle present in North America. We're also considered the most multi-ethnic (I hate that word) city on the planet and home to the greatest number of restaurants per capita of any metropolitan area.
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Billy Jean
post Jun 16 2003, 11:27 PM
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Athens is referred to as "The Classic City". It's very beautiful. I'm in love with this town. UGA is one of the oldest Universities, if not the oldest in the US, some thing like that! wacko.gif It's got a great feel to it. It's large enough to have that big city feel, an eclectic mini-metropolis. But at the same time there's a sense of community. Well, seperate but equal. It's pretty funny, the vast difference between the downtown crowd and the church goers, it's a sort of understood segregation. whistling.gif You can see Michael Stipe walking around at any given time with some buddy of his that just might look familiar. LOCAL MUSIC ROCKS! Even though I wub.gif MJ Thanks for making me feel welcomed Jaime!
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Kanyeshnah
post Jul 3 2003, 12:31 AM
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For some reason I can't really describe LA, but I do like living in it!
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Curmudgeon
post Jul 15 2003, 10:38 AM
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I was born and raised in Michigan, and have never lived elsewhere. It has been a number of different environments however.

My dad told me that mother woke him up and said, "It's time to go to the hospital." He drove to the hospital alone, and a neighbor drove mother. The doctor who delivered me did not survive long enough to sign my birth certificate. Mother had been his office nurse. Dad rolled the car en route to the hospital, and arrived well after I was born. Mother asked him for the car keys, and never let him drive again. I developed the habit of walking at an early age. A couple of weeks ago, at 57, my wife finally got me to drive a car across a state line.

I grew up in Grand Rapids, then still calling itself "The furniture capital of the world." At the time, I think American Seating, Steelcase, and Carl Forslund were about the only furniture makers left. I could look out my bedroom window, and read the time on a large clock several miles away. People would describe Michigan to me as a flat state, and I could not begin to see a flat spot anywhere in that area of the state. As I walked out my front door, it was probably 10 feet above the sidewalk. To the left, there was a retaining wall that dropped about 5 feet to let them build a house next door. To the right, we could step onto the roof of the neighbor's garage. The four corners of that city block were all at different elevations. The city still had one street paved with stones, and one paved with bricks for historical preservation. Sometime after I married my first wife, my mother-in-law told me that she had a contract on me if I ever came back to town. Fortunately, she's been dead about 15 years now, as I occasionally find reason to visit the city.

I moved to Midland, where I worked for Dow Chemical for thirty years. A departing newspaper editor once wrote that he would "miss the city's hills, both of them; and the city's hotly contested elections, the Republican primaries." I remember looking at an elevation map once. The river dropped less than 20 feet in the 20 miles or so to Lake Huron. Flood stage for the city was about 11 feet above normal river level. My memories of Dow are of pipelines, electrical conduits, and tank farms. While there were several "buildings" inside the 6400 acres or so inside the fenceline, they commonly had no walls. I had lived there for probably more than 20 years before I first discovered the Dow Gardens. They are the only place I have ever seen signs which read "Please walk on the grass." There is a bakery on Main street which produced donuts so delicious that I could identify them day old and blindfolded. I generally walked to and from work when I lived close enough. Omelets and More opened on Main street near the end of my career. If I was getting off the midnight shift, they would see me walking down the street, and breakfast and the morning paper would be waiting for me. It was a city built largely of ranch houses. A building more than 28 feet tall required a special deviation from the building dept. Dow Chemical had its own building dept., fire dept., police, and hospital.

I moved to Muskegon a few years ago for a job at the paper mill. The paper mill grinds up tons of trees on a daily basis. A history professor once told me that the lumber barons clear cut Michigan at least three times. Except for photographs that show the size of the trees that once grew here, you would find that hard to believe. Most of that lumber was shipped from Ports in Bay City and Muskegon.

Our yard is shaded with trees. There is about 25 square feet in front of my garage that gets wet in a light rain. The rest is caught by the leaves on the oak trees, and I have a number of pines in my yard as well. Somewhere in the process of moving here, I underwent a series of seizures, and while it took a while to sink in, I have forgotten how to practice the trades I was once trained in. When I started to read this thread, and saw which direction the toilet's flush, I thought "Micro-Motion." A couple hours later, I made the link in my head to "Coriolis Effect." I used to be able to explain quite rationally to an engineer that he could not place two Coriolis Effect meters in series, because they would interact with one another. (Coriolis first described the phenomenon that water goes down the drain at different speeds and directions depending on the latitude.) I still prefer walking to driving, but If I'm going very far, I carry a portable GPS unit with me. When I remember how to use it, it is very helpful. Unfortunately, it's telling me the car is parked in North Carolina at the moment, so I have to go in and erase a file or two. Our house is located probably less than a mile from Lake Michigan, with a sand mine and a large dune protecting us from the prevailing winds. The sand mine, when all the permits are in place will become a very expensive housing project.

Downtown Muskegon is in transition. The owner of the downtown Mall failed to meet mortgage payments, and it is currently vacant. Plans being discussed range from a cross lake ferry service to Milwaukee, and an unlikely Casino. A restaurant downtown, in business for 21 years, has been given 30 days to vacate according to yesterday's newspaper. The latest census figures show that the area is shrinking. It is below 40,000 for the first time since 1920. A couple of abandoned factories downtown are currently being converted to expensive apartments. It seems to me, an odd gamble in an area where people who can afford to, usually buy their home for the long term investment value.

Our daughter is in a school program that we have a commitment to stay in through next June. At that point, we will likely look at moving. It will be an interesting process. I'm unemployed, with no real job prospects at all, and no real idea as to where to move to. We have a friend looking at a house in North Carolina, and encouraging us to move there too. It seems so many miles, and so many unknowns away.
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Ed Toner
post Jul 23 2003, 07:09 PM
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Brick, NJ. Ocean Co., on da Joisey Shore - You got a problem wit dat? Yeah, YOU, I'm talkin to YOU!
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Ataal
post Aug 1 2003, 06:29 PM
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Although I live in Reno, Nevada now, I was born in Ogden, Utah.

Utah has quite possibly the most amazing rock formations in the country, maybe even in the top 5 places in the world.

Here is a link to some of the national parks:

http://www.areaparks.com/utah.html

Check out Bryce Canyon and the Arches in particular. Most of the rock formations were created by Lake Bonneville, which used to encompass most of the state of Utah 15,000 years or so ago. It later receded into what we now call The Great Salt lake.

Info on Lake Bonneville:

http://www.ugs.state.ut.us/online/PI-39/pi39pg01.htm

The Great Salt Lake, is just that. It's one of the largest lakes in the United States and has no outlets, which is why there is so much salt, it isn't carried away from the lake. Another thing left over from Lake Bonneville is the Bonneville salt flats, info here:

http://www.utah.com/playgrounds/bonneville_salt.htm

But, aside from all that, probably the most noted thing about Utah is it's culture. It's one of the very few places that a single religion has remained together in a comparatively small space. They have branched out worldwide of course through missionaries and the sort, but the majority are still living in Utah. Although the mormons have probably one of the worst reputations, coming from actual experience living there, they are the most friendly and generous people as a group I've ever met.

As for Nevada, I'll try and stick with the city or Reno as it's almost a completely different place than Las Vegas.

Nevada itself used to be part of the "Utah Territory", basically if you just erase the utah/nevada border, that's the utah territory. Most Nevada cities started off as trading posts for the mormon settlers. Reno became a mining town. Later, when the casinos started thriving, it became a tourist town. For a quick tour of Reno's history, click this:

http://www.nevadaweb.com/cnt/r-t/reno.html

Las Vegas gets the contracts for the biggest and baddest attractions, so Reno has fallen short in tourism over the last few decades. The great thing about Reno is your relatively close to just about anything you'd want to see and do. We're within an hour of Hiking, snow skiing, water skiing at many lakes including the awesome Lake Tahoe, off roading, historical landmarks such as Virginia City(fairly well preserved town from the Old west shoot-em-up days), our state capital and of course gambling if you so choose.

Both states have roughly the same climate in the north, very cold in winter, fairly hot in summer. Utah gets more precipitation than Nevada though.

Oh, to you savannah'ns, I just watched the movie "The legend of Bagger Vance". Although I can't confirm that the movie was filmed in Savannah, it was depicted as Savannah, GA in the movie. If that's where it was filmed, that's a beautiful place.
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Robin_Scotland
post Sep 24 2003, 09:20 PM
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My turn I guess. smile.gif

I live in the Kingdom of Fife, in east central Scotland. Scotland, as you probably know, is part of the United Kingdom. The United Kingdom is made up of Great Britain (Scotland, England and Wales) and Northern Ireland. Scotland is the 2nd largest nation in the United Kingdom after England, with a population around 5 million.

Im not entirely sure why we are called a Kingdom. The old Scottish capital, Dunfermline, may be the reason. Plus we have the Scottish royal palace, Falkland Palace, here. Fife is the 2nd largest council region in Scotland after Glasgow with a population of 350,000. We are also the home of golf! Sorry about that!

So lets do some Scotland stereotypes smile.gif

First off, we dont wear kilts and tartan. I have worn a kilt once and that was to my senior year prom. There are a few oddballs who do go around in the full kit, but they are just that - oddballs.

There is no Loch Ness monster. Sorry! Although maybe I shouldnt say that considering how much of our economy depends on sales of green Nessie toys to Japanese tourists. Althouh Loch Ness is a must visit site, its very beautiful and peaceful up there.

We dont hate the English. Well i dont, and every other normal Scot doesnt. I try not to associate with people obsessed with William Wallace and ancient history between our two nations, as my mum works in Mental Health Care and I know how dangerous these types of people can be.

Anyway its a nice place really, and the weather isnt all that bad. Sure it rains for like 60% of the time, but how else would we make the best whiskey in the world! Not that Im against an occasional American corn whisky for a change mind you, but Im pretty much a Bells and Famous Grouse-a-holic
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satu largi
post Oct 15 2003, 04:48 PM
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biggrin.gif
QUOTE
They're all descended from transported criminals
biggrin.gif

.As well as that swirling backwards water.. lets not forget the light switches go down for on, and up for off..
And if you see a sign advertising "Loose Single Grannies"'..why, thats just apples they are selling!

Hi, everyone. I'm exactly half-way between Sydney and Brisbane, on Australia's east coast, near Coffs Harbour.
Here's a local tourist link..
http://www.escapenorth.com.au
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Horyok
post Oct 15 2003, 10:20 PM
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I live in Northern France. The main city, Lille, is located only 15km from the Belgian border and it deserves its name of capital of the North. The population in town is about 40.000 but we are part of a town council that groups about 1 million people in all. We locals like to name ourselves the Ch'ti, which roughly means "The ones from these parts" in local dialect. Guess you have to maintain old traditions alive, haven't you? thumbsup.gif

The landscape is quite diverse and it looks a bit like Kent (for those of you who've ever been to England), a bit like Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to give you an idea of the state of industry. The weather is quite consistent : we get our share of rolling clouds, cold wind and pouring rains more than we need, all year round! laugh.gif

The countryside to the East (Avesnois) is beautiful with hills, meadows, forests and cottages. It's a must see in summer... Having been to other places in the world, I have to say this area ranges in my current top 3, with the shores of Brittany and the highs of Sedona in Arizona. w00t.gif The shores of the Opale Coast are a wonder of beauty too. wink2.gif

We have many different traditions, including the legendary carnival of Dunkirk and Saint Nicolas fest in the East. At the beginning of the 20th century, many people spoke Dutch, but French has won over in just a few decades. The Northerners are an interesting folk indeed, at the crossroads of Europe and its traditions.

We're only two hours away in car from Amsterdam, one hour from Brussels, two hours from Paris and one hour and fourty minutes from London in train! Four European capitals within easy reach, what are we asking for? tongue.gif

Here are a few links, if you're interested :

http://www.crt-nordpasdecalais.fr/an/
http://www.cdt-nord.fr/an/index.htm
http://www.mincoin.com/galeriephotos.php
http://www.mincoin.com/fondecran/fonda.php

Enjoy!

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Mrs. Pigpen
post Oct 15 2003, 10:34 PM
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I live within fifteen minutes from the Sphinx, Paris, Venice, and Rome. Unfortunately, their very miniaturized versions with bright lights and numerous slot machines. sad.gif Away from the strip, there's a lot of desert, but on the bright side you can do and see pretty much anything here, and it's usually warm. smile.gif

This post has been edited by Mrs. Pigpen: Oct 15 2003, 10:34 PM
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PrismPaul
post Oct 15 2003, 11:37 PM
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I live in beautiful Midland, Michigan where... well, where Curmudgeon apparantly lived for 30 years - you can read about it in his post above. thumbsup.gif

It's a great place to live if you can do without good restaurants and hills, and if you don't mind the Michigan weather, which I don't.
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SoCaliente_1
post Oct 16 2003, 08:21 PM
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I live in Del Mar, which is a little coastal town in San Diego county located about halfway between the border of Mx. and Orange County.

As our house sits atop a little cliff we can see the pacific ocean from the decks outside our bedrooms. Sunsets are the very best. Being close to the water we also get a large part of the morning marine layer that those living 2-3miles inland don't get. It usually burns off by 10am.

between Del Mar and Solana beach coastal, there are open farm areas from which hot air balloons take off and float in a direct path over our house. sometime as many as 6 or 7 at a time. sometimes flying so low as to hear our "Heeeeellooooos," as we all wave to each other. Happens everyday at 6pm.

beautiful things happening all the time in SoCal. smile.gif

(I would upload a picture from my pic file if I knew how.) hmmm.gif
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