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> Should a general sales tax replace taxing some of the lowest, (i.e. th
Supposn
post Jun 1 2017, 04:03 AM
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Should a general sales tax replace taxing some of the lowest, (i.e. threshold) portions of our taxable incomes.

I advocate rather than taxing employers’ payrolls, employees wages, and the great preponderance of net incomes, we replace some those tax revenues derived from lowest (i.e. threshold) income levels with a general sales tax. (FICA payroll taxes’ proportionally most grievous effects are upon the working poor).

Contra-intuitively, shifting from taxing individuals’ lesser annual amounts of incomes, (their threshold incomes) to be replaced by general sales tax revenues, would increase rather than decrease the proportion of high incomes earners contributions to tax revenues.
Although sales tax rates are not progressive, they can (to a very limited extent), and should be drafted to act somewhat progressively. General sales taxes themselves are not actually regressive or progressive.

Due to sales taxes comparatively simpler legal drafting, sales taxes are less prone to exceptions, and regulations that increase tax avoidance or tax evasion. Individual’s purchases rather than their filed tax returns are the more accurate indicators of individuals’ comparative incomes and wealth.

This proposed modification of federal tax policy would enable our income tax regulations to be simplified and enable revenue neutral reduction of regular income tax rates, with absolutely no net increase of tax contributions from the working poor. It will be both socially and economically net beneficial to our nation.

Respectfully, Supposn

This post has been edited by Supposn: Jun 1 2017, 04:11 AM
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