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> If You Were A High School Senior, What would you do or what advice would you give?
AuthorMusician
post Apr 11 2017, 11:17 AM
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Imagine that you're a senior in high school with graduation rapidly approaching. Alternatively, imagine that someone you care about is in this situation.

What would you plan on doing after graduation?

- or -

What advice would you give to your special graduate?

Possible subjects to address include further education, career paths, marriage, travel, and having fun. Get as broad as you want on subjects and specifics. Also, consider GED from home schooling and open school graduation as well as traditional high school. Keep in mind that further education and work opportunities are changing quickly in some areas, not so much in others.

For example, I'd look into computer systems security and ecology as possible career paths while advising my special grad to keep music as a serious hobby but not a career path. Why? More on that later.

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akaCG
post Apr 12 2017, 01:57 AM
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What advice would you give to your special graduate?

It would be:

Before you make up your mind, dear 'special' high school graduate, please check out:

http://profoundlydisconnected.com/scholarship/

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Mrs. Pigpen
post Apr 13 2017, 12:11 PM
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Great topic, AM. smile.gif

Imagine that you're a senior in high school with graduation rapidly approaching. Alternatively, imagine that someone you care about is in this situation.

What would you plan on doing after graduation?


I think it depends on the person. If he or she is ready for college, that's a good thing to do. Alternately, if he or she isn't, I'd say it's better to gain experience working a job. That might also give him or her the incentive to work hard and go to school (my neighbor's son spent last summer, after he graduated, working about 50 hours a week mowing the lawn at the airport...he saw all the adults who had been doing that for over a decade and knew he didn't want to do that the rest of his life. Working for a moving company can have this effect too).
I'm not a big fan of touring Europe (or Asia or South America or wherever) at that age.
To me it's wasted money...do that later in life when you'll learn more and appreciate it a lot more. But that's just my .01

I've met some really outstanding young military people. Most of them had a story about not knowing what they wanted to do and finding fulfillment and direction in the military. They are entrusted with a great deal of responsibility at a very young age.
Recently our oldest son joined ROTC. That's something I never expected because he had no interest whatsoever before he started college. About six months in it became the only thing he wants to do, and he's very driven now to get good grades for competition in the top spots.

I'll just throw out there is a critical pilot shortage now. But that goes in cycles.

I also think trade schools are a sound investment. A good tradesman can make more than a college graduate (in some cases a lot more than most college graduates). I also think community colleges are underrated. Universities have become a sort of veblen good for parents in particular.

This post has been edited by Mrs. Pigpen: Apr 13 2017, 12:20 PM
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AuthorMusician
post Apr 14 2017, 06:26 PM
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QUOTE(Mrs. Pigpen @ Apr 13 2017, 08:11 AM) *
Great topic, AM. smile.gif

Imagine that you're a senior in high school with graduation rapidly approaching. Alternatively, imagine that someone you care about is in this situation.

What would you plan on doing after graduation?


I think it depends on the person. If he or she is ready for college, that's a good thing to do. Alternately, if he or she isn't, I'd say it's better to gain experience working a job. That might also give him or her the incentive to work hard and go to school (my neighbor's son spent last summer, after he graduated, working about 50 hours a week mowing the lawn at the airport...he saw all the adults who had been doing that for over a decade and knew he didn't want to do that the rest of his life. Working for a moving company can have this effect too).
I'm not a big fan of touring Europe (or Asia or South America or wherever) at that age.
To me it's wasted money...do that later in life when you'll learn more and appreciate it a lot more. But that's just my .01

I've met some really outstanding young military people. Most of them had a story about not knowing what they wanted to do and finding fulfillment and direction in the military. They are entrusted with a great deal of responsibility at a very young age.
Recently our oldest son joined ROTC. That's something I never expected because he had no interest whatsoever before he started college. About six months in it became the only thing he wants to do, and he's very driven now to get good grades for competition in the top spots.

I'll just throw out there is a critical pilot shortage now. But that goes in cycles.

I also think trade schools are a sound investment. A good tradesman can make more than a college graduate (in some cases a lot more than most college graduates). I also think community colleges are underrated. Universities have become a sort of veblen good for parents in particular.

I have a lot of these thoughts too, both from the perspectives of what I'd do and advice I'd give.

After my actual high school graduation, my folks let me stay at their lake place in N. MN on the condition that I'd help fill the property, which we called Camp Swampy. About a third of it was wetland, about half an acre or so. That was a great experience for getting the feet wet (bad pun) living on my own and keeping me physically busy while sorting things out.

Afterwards I worked as a grocery bag boy/shelf stocker, then a parts man for a mining equipment outfit. Both jobs made going to college a lot more attractive, starting with community college.

Military wasn't an option due to Vietnam. The years were 1970 to 1973.

Anyway, I'd go into computer science with an emphasis on security, but that's also after an almost completed lifetime. Or maybe longer, the old body is doing better than expected and a music flame has rekindled.

Each young person is different after graduation, so my advice is for someone like I was back then.

1. Figure out who you are as much as you can.

2. Follow your natural passions in regards to education and career.

3. Don't expect anything to come from a music career, but if it's a stronger passion than anything else, approach it with firm dedication and resolve. It still won't turn out well even if you make it big, probably. Enter into this with great caution and brutal honesty with yourself. This is also true about other paths, such as art, storytelling, your own business(es), and pretty much anything that isn't W2 (employed rather than occupied). If you have any conflicting natural passion, it's highly unlikely that music is the way to go. If so, keep it a hobby and enjoy being a true lover of the art, also called an amateur.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=amateur

Oh, and if you do go pro with music, you'll get sick of your own repertoire but won't have the time or energy to explore new musical ideas, mostly.

4. If you have no clue what to do, the military will help you decide. It's a much better deal today than when I was a high school graduate, but you do become the property of The United States. It's like extreme socialism -- you get fed and housed for free at basic levels and are told what to do a lot of the time. An alternative is to go into the liberal arts, which is the opposite: No free rides and you not only can think/act for yourself, you must. Plus it's great preparation for grad degrees or rapidly changing industries.

5. My suggestion is to not get married, but holding off on that kind of decision until the late 20s or early thirties. However, not much else makes you grow up faster than starting a family. The downside is you won't have much freedom of choice, and I'm not just talking sex here. Then there's the high risk of divorce, which can really set you back financially and emotionally. Or it might set you up if you marry into money. Any which way, you would benefit from having a fully mature brain, which generally occurs in the later 20s.

6. Don't listen to me as if I have the answers. Go be a stupid kid like everyone else. It somehow works out for most people. Try to keep out of jail, off the street, or from becoming someone's minion (slave, bitch, etcetera, etcetera, etcetera).

Heh, as one of my high school friends once said, they ain't gonna catch the Midnight Rider. It's an old rock lyric, pretty current in The Day.

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/allmanbroth...nightrider.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midnight_Rider

This post has been edited by AuthorMusician: Apr 14 2017, 06:40 PM
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AuthorMusician
post Apr 25 2017, 02:01 AM
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Back when I was a high school senior, the magic word was plastics, mostly used as a joke. And it had nothing to do with credit cards, as those things didn't exist in the way they do today.

Advice for my special soon-to-be graduate is graphene:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0ZMi83oUjk

And try not to get seduced by Mrs. Robinson, coo-coo-cah-choo.
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