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> Tea Party win Delaware nomination, A victory for Democrats?
Julian
post Sep 15 2010, 12:03 PM
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Christine O'Donnell wins Delaware Republican Senate nomination

QUOTE
O'Donnell was the leader of the Christian lobby group Saviour's Alliance for Lifting the Truth. In a television interview a decade ago, she said: "The Bible says that lust in your heart is committing adultery. So you can't masturbate without lust."

She will now stand for the US Senate in November for the seat vacated by Joe Biden when he became vice-president two years ago.

Such is the anger among conservatives who think Obama is a socialist and the Republicans not rightwing enough that they were prepared to vote in O'Donnell, even though polls suggest she has little chance of beating the Democrats for the seat in November. The same polls suggested that Castle could win the traditionally Democratic state.


In the UK, for most of the last decade, the Conservative party (closest equivalent to the GOP) shifted rightwards, under pressure from their own right wing, after losing to the left-of-centre landslide in 1997 that put Tony Blair in power. This caused 13 years of electoral failure (small gains here and there, but generally poor performance on the national stage) until David Cameron took over a few years back, under whom they moved back towards the political centre and with whom they have now regained office (though only through coalition with the centrist Liberal Democrat party, moving the whole coalition somewhat further to the centre, at least in theory.)

Labour underwent a similar crisis of identity during the Thatcher years, when party loyalists moved the party further to the left, resulting in repeated failure to gain ground, which was only turned around when more moderate leadership made efforts to expel extremists (under Neil Kinnock) and move the party back toward the centre.

I wonder if something similar is not now happening to the Republicans. It seems to me that the battle for the soul of the party - between hard right grassroots activists, and more moderate leaders, which the hardliners seem to be winning at the moment - is not particularly attractive to a majority of voters. What point is there in winning an argument on the direction of the party if that direction is somewhere that voters don't want to go?

Is this win counter-prouctive for Delaware Republicans, Tea Party or not? Why, or why not? Edited to add: Or, is it a realignmnet of an out of touch elite with mainstream Republicanism?

Does a Tea Party Republican nominee, for House or Senate, stand a chance to win a seat in Congress? Who and where? Edited to add: If not, why not, and is that a problem for Republicanism or for the country?

Is the push to the right among Republicans, exemplified by the Tea Party, taking the rest of the country with it, or alienating middle of the road voters and leaving the political centre open for Democrat gains?


Edited to balance the debate questions a little better

This post has been edited by Julian: Sep 15 2010, 02:13 PM
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Dontreadonme
post Sep 17 2010, 02:48 PM
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QUOTE(Gray Seal @ Sep 17 2010, 10:42 AM) *
One thing which needs reminding is that there is diversity in the tea party. Palin is the quasi representative of the repackaged neo-con aspect of the tea party. O' Donnell appears to be from this wing. The other faction in the tea party has the quasi representative of Ron Paul. This aspect wants smaller government, limited federal duties, and a non-offensive military.


You raise a great point, there are many good people supporting the tea party movement. But my question is where are the spokespeople for the truly conservative faction? We are inundated with the Palin's, Beck's, Kibbe's, etc.....where is the voice of the sane TP'ers?
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Raptavio
post Sep 17 2010, 02:48 PM
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QUOTE(Gray Seal @ Sep 17 2010, 09:42 AM) *
One thing which needs reminding is that there is diversity in the tea party. Palin is the quasi representative of the repackaged neo-con aspect of the tea party. O' Donnell appears to be from this wing. The other faction in the tea party has the quasi representative of Ron Paul. This aspect wants smaller government, limited federal duties, and a non-offensive military. O' Donnell does not show much for many tea party folks to cheer about.

The Republican Party does not have much to offer if it clings to its recent history of big government, offensive use of the military, and social conservatism thrust upon people via central government. Neither O' Donnell nor Castle represent a change in direction for the Republican Party.

I think the Democratic Party is very comfortable with O' Donnell. They are not at all comfortable with the Ron Paul faction of the tea party. There is a concerted effort to paint the entire tea party with one brush, the color the big government beneficiaries wish the public to see. The last thing Democrats wish to discuss is the Ron Paul perspective. O' Donnell gives them an easy opponent which does not challenge the status quo, win or lose.


The vulnerability of the Ron Paul variant is that their remarkable moral consistency plays poorly, as in their disagreement with the portion of the 1964 Civil Rights act that enjoins private business from discriminating. Democrats have an ace in the hole there.

However, I will say that from a personal perspective, I respect Ron Paul for his principled stands.
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BoF
post Sep 17 2010, 02:58 PM
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QUOTE(Gray Seal @ Sep 17 2010, 09:42 AM) *
I think the Democratic Party is very comfortable with O' Donnell. They are not at all comfortable with the Ron Paul faction of the tea party.

Would the Ron Paul faction of the TEA party agree with Rand Paul's restrictive babbling on abortion?

QUOTE
[Rand Paul's]socially conservative views have earned the respect and trust of church leaders across Kentucky.

http://www.randpaul2010.com/2010/02/grayso...out-rand-again/

Rand Paul's abortion position doesn't seem much diferent than Christine O'Donnell's or Sharron Angle's.

BTW: Who the hell cares whether or not Kentucky's church leaders respect Rand Paul?

Edited to fix typo.

This post has been edited by BoF: Sep 17 2010, 10:44 PM
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Gray Seal
post Sep 17 2010, 03:46 PM
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There is a social conservative religion aspect to the tea party which Rand Paul does partially represent. The abortion issue is complicated. The Constitution has been interpreted to permit the supreme court to dictated abortion regulation. Clearing up that mess would be a prerequisite to changing the current legal standing of abortion and the federal government. It puts the abortion issue on a back burner as an issue.

When a tea party attendee, I do not much care for the social conservative issues. I do prefer a proper constitutional solution to the problem but do not support either the pro Roe vs Wade nor the pro-life viewpoints. Social conservatism does not follow the intent of the Constitution. The faction in the United States which wants more right wing Christian morality in government is a big government position which disturbs me. A government based upon this mentality is no improvement over the mindset in office now. This social conservative faction is large and easy to mobilize via churches and could have been the major determinant in the Delaware Republican primary.

As to the Civil Rights issue, it did not solely prevent private businesses from discrimination, as you mentioned. Most of the act dealt with preventing government from discriminating and this is supported by Rand Paul. Democrats, any big government believers, want government regulation of private business. So, yes, Democrat have an ace in the hole for people who want big government. For people who recognize freedom is important, they will not want big government to regulate in the area of discrimination and allow customers to make their own judgments on the matter. This is the freedom based means to limit the existence of private businesses which discriminate. The issue is not an ace in the hole for the growing faction of Americans which recognize big government is a big problem.

I consider the abortion issue and the civil rights act issues to be presented in the light of big government by those who want big government. The tea party faction I support has these issues to discuss what is the proper role of government.

I have not read anything about O' Donnell which gives me the impression she is committed to smaller federal government. She looks to be a neo-con to me. I would hope the people in Delaware will vote elsewhere than the Democrats or Republicans for improvements in Washington DC. in this particular Senate race. No matter what easy media says, many tea party attendees will be doing just that.

The libertarian ideas have not caught fire in this election cycle. Meanwhile, the easy media squawks on promoting the agenda of big government (which is their own agenda), diverting the public, and failing to address the breath of policy solutions in a fair, broad, and serious manner. It will take some effort by voters to rise above this.
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akaCG
post Sep 17 2010, 04:26 PM
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QUOTE(Gray Seal @ Sep 17 2010, 11:46 AM) *
...
The libertarian ideas have not caught fire in this election cycle. ...
...

I disagree.

Earlier this year, I spent about a month traveling cross-country and back, and included 8 TEA Party events into my overall itinerary, starting with the one in Searchlight, Nevada (Harry Reid's hometown). I wanted to see with my own eyes and hear with my own ears what these events were all about in different parts of the country. I wanted to see what regional differences, if any, there might be.

In most cases, social issues didn't even break into the top 5. In a few cases, they did. In Denver, Colorado (Tancredo country), the immigration issue was definitely more visible, but even there it didn't come close to superceding the overwhelmingly dominant theme of ALL of the TEA Party events I attended, the theme that fired up the attending crowds the most.

What was said theme?

This:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7ll-nCfiVQ

NOTE: that was in St. George, Utah, one of the events I attended.

EDITED TO ADD:
Out of all of the TEA Party pics I took along the way, this one is one of my favorites:
http://i784.photobucket.com/albums/yy122/j...e/P10002061.jpg

This post has been edited by akaCG: Sep 17 2010, 04:36 PM
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Dontreadonme
post Sep 17 2010, 04:28 PM
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Uncle Sam won't let me access YouTube from work....can you explain what that theme was?
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pheeler
post Sep 17 2010, 04:43 PM
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QUOTE(Gray Seal @ Sep 17 2010, 07:46 AM) *
There is a social conservative religion aspect to the tea party which Rand Paul does partially represent. The abortion issue is complicated. The Constitution has been interpreted to permit the supreme court to dictated abortion regulation. Clearing up that mess would be a prerequisite to changing the current legal standing of abortion and the federal government. It puts the abortion issue on a back burner as an issue.

When a tea party attendee, I do not much care for the social conservative issues. I do prefer a proper constitutional solution to the problem but do not support either the pro Roe vs Wade nor the pro-life viewpoints. Social conservatism does not follow the intent of the Constitution. The faction in the United States which wants more right wing Christian morality in government is a big government position which disturbs me. A government based upon this mentality is no improvement over the mindset in office now. This social conservative faction is large and easy to mobilize via churches and could have been the major determinant in the Delaware Republican primary.

As to the Civil Rights issue, it did not solely prevent private businesses from discrimination, as you mentioned. Most of the act dealt with preventing government from discriminating and this is supported by Rand Paul. Democrats, any big government believers, want government regulation of private business. So, yes, Democrat have an ace in the hole for people who want big government. For people who recognize freedom is important, they will not want big government to regulate in the area of discrimination and allow customers to make their own judgments on the matter. This is the freedom based means to limit the existence of private businesses which discriminate. The issue is not an ace in the hole for the growing faction of Americans which recognize big government is a big problem.

I consider the abortion issue and the civil rights act issues to be presented in the light of big government by those who want big government. The tea party faction I support has these issues to discuss what is the proper role of government.

I have not read anything about O' Donnell which gives me the impression she is committed to smaller federal government. She looks to be a neo-con to me. I would hope the people in Delaware will vote elsewhere than the Democrats or Republicans for improvements in Washington DC. in this particular Senate race. No matter what easy media says, many tea party attendees will be doing just that.

The libertarian ideas have not caught fire in this election cycle. Meanwhile, the easy media squawks on promoting the agenda of big government (which is their own agenda), diverting the public, and failing to address the breath of policy solutions in a fair, broad, and serious manner. It will take some effort by voters to rise above this.

Gray Seal: You have a very clear and logical viewpoint that seems to be in line with what an actual modern "Tea Party" movement should have. The problem, as you say yourself, is that you belong to one faction of the Tea Party. The movement is so grassroots that it doesn't really even know what it is. When you lack leadership, you also lack focus.

The only unifying element in the Tea Party is anger. Some people are angry about big government, some people are angry about the lack of Christian values, and, ugly as it is, some people are angry that we have a black president. I hope the voices that drown out the screaming are ones with a clear agenda and practical solutions, but I don't see that happening any time soon from the current incarnation of the Tea Party.

That said, I don't believe that the Democrats are going to be handed anything by any Tea Party nomination. They've underestimated the visceral reaction voters have to social issues, and even though O'Donnell's positions are very far right of the majority of Americans (read: she is a scary religious nut who believes masturbation is wrong), I wouldn't put it past her to win the Delaware seat.
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Amlord
post Sep 17 2010, 06:21 PM
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QUOTE(AuthorMusician @ Sep 15 2010, 05:37 PM) *
Will any of the tea party types win? I strongly doubt that, and so Democrats will not only retain majorities, the majorities will grow.

I think I'll submit this as the quote of the year. You must be the only person in the country that thinks that the Democrats will pick up seats this November. ermm.gif

Is this win counter-prouctive for Delaware Republicans, Tea Party or not? Why, or why not? Edited to add: Or, is it a realignmnet of an out of touch elite with mainstream Republicanism?

There is a strong anti-government sentiment in the country. Strong is an understatement. Castle voted for the stimulus, he voted for Cap and Trade. He voted for a lot of things that are symptomatic of what voters do not like about Washington. After that, he asked Republican voters for a promotion from the House to the Senate. The voters said no.

What has been harming the Republican party is sore loser Republicans who refuse to back the Republican primary winner. For Pete's sake you lost, get over it. These Tea Party types are more conservative and that is what the Republican party wants right now because that is what the country wants.

So get over yourself Mike Castle and Charlie Crist, and Lisa Murkowski and work for the party that has worked to get you elected in the past. It isn't about you as an individual, it is about the party.

Does a Tea Party Republican nominee, for House or Senate, stand a chance to win a seat in Congress? Who and where? Edited to add: If not, why not, and is that a problem for Republicanism or for the country?

"Republicanism" is impossible to define so the revised question is impossible to answer. Many so-called Tea Party candidates are going to win this November.

Is the push to the right among Republicans, exemplified by the Tea Party, taking the rest of the country with it, or alienating middle of the road voters and leaving the political centre open for Democrat gains?

The political center has abandoned the Democratic party because it is not impressed with the direction it is taking this country. Enthusiasm is on the Republican side and if some middle of the road person says "I won't vote for this wacky <insert Tea Party candidate here>." then they are going to stay home, not vote to continue the current path. Only a third choice (i.e. an independent Republican) is likely to soften the blow for Democrats.
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Gray Seal
post Sep 17 2010, 06:49 PM
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akaCG, when I say libertarian ideals have not caught fire, it means that those ideals are not going to be represented by many numbers in elected office in levels which will affect the predominate mentality which exists today. There is a puff of smoke and some flames which did not exist before but it will take many more voters to be convinced that freedom is paramount before real reform via the election box to occur. It is good to see the beginning of the voter revolution but it is not enough at this point in time. We are, unfortunately, going to see false libertarian candidates such as Stu Brown who appear to be a break through but are just more of the same. I think O' Donnell is probably of that ilk but I will see if her site is back up where I can see her stances directly from her.

pheeler, your observations are good. The tea party is diverse, it does have people who are angry but have not figured out what is wrong, and voters have reacted and will react viscerally to social opinions. I do not think the diversity is a problem. It is a strength to gather the many factions together. It is going to take some time for the importance of freedom as the common cause to settle in. I do think the ideals of smaller government, limited federal government, and halting offensive military will be the common themes which will unite the tea party and gain strength. People are still viscerally attracted to the past political big government themes mixed with a bit of tea party lingo and fooled into supporting the same old, same old.

I doubt the Delaware Republican primary senate result will be any step towards reforming Washington DC. If either the Democrat or Republican candidates win we lose. The federal government will not change significantly this November and it will continue to tread water and stay mired in mediocrity with continued loss of freedom.
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akaCG
post Sep 17 2010, 07:09 PM
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This November, Delaware voters will be choosing between:

In the "Red" corner, a woman with close to no political experience, faaar-right views on social issues, and some Geithner/Daschle/Rangel type personal/campaign finance issues, but who can be counted upon to vote against ObamaCare, cap-and-tax, "comprehensive" illegal immigration reform, etc.

In the "Blue" corner, a man with plenty of Washington experience, Pelosi-type Lefty views, and who can be counted upon to vote for whatever Reid (who calls him his "pet") puts in front of him.

This year, even in "Blue" Delaware, automatically counting O'Donnell out would be foolhardy.

We live in interesting times.

QUOTE(Gray Seal @ Sep 17 2010, 02:49 PM) *
akaCG, when I say libertarian ideals have not caught fire, it means that those ideals are not going to be represented by many numbers in elected office in levels which will affect the predominate mentality which exists today. There is a puff of smoke and some flames which did not exist before but it will take many more voters to be convinced that freedom is paramount before real reform via the election box to occur. It is good to see the beginning of the voter revolution but it is not enough at this point in time. We are, unfortunately, going to see false libertarian candidates such as Stu Brown who appear to be a break through but are just more of the same. I think O' Donnell is probably of that ilk but I will see if her site is back up where I can see her stances directly from her.
...

OK, I think I see what you mean. Yes, this is still that vulnerable stage when, having managed to get the clump of dry grass to light up, one still has to be careful. One or two wrong moves, and the budding fire flickers out. Too strong a breath, too many twigs thrown on, and it's back to square one.
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Gray Seal
post Sep 17 2010, 07:26 PM
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akaCG, I like your illustration of the starting fire. Your continuing of the fire story hits some points mine did not encompass.
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AuthorMusician
post Sep 17 2010, 09:16 PM
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QUOTE(Amlord @ Sep 17 2010, 02:21 PM) *
QUOTE(AuthorMusician @ Sep 15 2010, 05:37 PM) *
Will any of the tea party types win? I strongly doubt that, and so Democrats will not only retain majorities, the majorities will grow.

I think I'll submit this as the quote of the year. You must be the only person in the country that thinks that the Democrats will pick up seats this November. ermm.gif


Actually, I'm not the only one now. But I will accept the nomination if selected and will serve if elected. cool.gif

I've found that common wisdom, when it comes to politics, is usually wrong. It's always wrong if that's all that prognosticators go on. The assumption that the President's party always loses seats in the midterms is that kind of common wisdom and prognostication. This midterm cycle is different from any other.

O'Donnell's nomination, along with the many situations that arose during the primaries, leads me to be more certain than ever that these midterms will be different. Also the behavior of the Congressional minority. That behavior was my only solid ground for thinking these midterms will be exactly opposite of what has been expected. But now the primaries have turned out even stranger that I dared to think.

In the midterms of the past, there wasn't a YouTube presence, and the voice from the Democratic/liberal/progressive side was quite weak. This time the voice has gained strength and talks effectively to parts of the electorate never before accessible. So, Angle could not get away with her 180 degree turn; O'Donnell won't be able to distance herself from her past quickly enough; Rand Paul has that Civil Rights thing clinging on.

Most important is that the GOP is no longer the dependable lock-stepping organization it once was. This happened to the Democrats with Reagan. Seems to be a symptom of a party that has lost its main direction.

It is a bit clumsy, but not letting the last party in control take the keys back is actually a real attitude among the non-tea-party types.

I have a better one: Don't do a repUblican turn now!

It's basically what former President Clinton said on the Daily Show last night. Give us two more years, and if we haven't fixed stuff by then, throw us out (paraphrased). I'm thinking the attitude of the majority will be to give two years of super-duper majorities in Congress -- maybe the Senate only. See what happens then. It just doesn't make sense to give the keys back to the Republicans, and most definitely not to the crazy Republicans.

This is of course assuming that the electorate isn't as or more crazy. If it is, then all bets are off. I guess that anger thing is supposed to work. I doubt it.

This post has been edited by AuthorMusician: Sep 17 2010, 09:24 PM
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akaCG
post Sep 17 2010, 10:12 PM
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QUOTE(AuthorMusician @ Sep 17 2010, 05:16 PM) *
...
This is of course assuming that the electorate isn't as or more crazy. If it is, then all bets are off. ...
...

Well, not quite ALL bets. One could always try to implement what might be called the "Bertolt Brecht Tongue In Cheek Solution" (bolding and coloring mine):

After the uprising of the 17th June
The Secretary of the Writers Union
Had leaflets distributed in the Stalinallee
Stating that the people
Had forfeited the confidence of the government

And could win it back only
By redoubled efforts. Would it not be easier
In that case for the government
To dissolve the people
And elect another
?


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Jobius
post Sep 17 2010, 10:23 PM
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QUOTE(AuthorMusician @ Sep 17 2010, 02:16 PM) *
QUOTE(Amlord @ Sep 17 2010, 02:21 PM) *
QUOTE(AuthorMusician @ Sep 15 2010, 05:37 PM) *
Will any of the tea party types win? I strongly doubt that, and so Democrats will not only retain majorities, the majorities will grow.

I think I'll submit this as the quote of the year. You must be the only person in the country that thinks that the Democrats will pick up seats this November. ermm.gif


Actually, I'm not the only one now. But I will accept the nomination if selected and will serve if elected. cool.gif

. . .

It is a bit clumsy, but not letting the last party in control take the keys back is actually a real attitude among the non-tea-party types.

I have a better one: Don't do a repUblican turn now!

So you're liking that car metaphor, huh? The one with the ditch? Is wagering allowed on ad.gif? 'Cause if you're wrong about November, I want you to get me a Slurpee.

If the Democrats pick up seats, I'll send you some delicious homebrew beer. It's a good trade, assuming you like beer.
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post Sep 17 2010, 10:49 PM
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QUOTE(Gray Seal @ Sep 17 2010, 10:46 AM) *
The abortion issue is complicated.

Regardless of how complicated the abortion issue might be, Rand Paul is not the same “libertarian” as his father. In fact, I question his libertarian credentials. If he had his way, it would mean creating a police state regarding women’s reproductive rights.

Note his answers to a questionnaire by the Kentucky Right to Life Association Political Action Committee, particularly question No. 2 about exceptions for rape and incest.
http://c0469351.cdn.cloudfiles.rackspacecl...RTLresponse.pdf
(This is a pdf file)

Paul position is every bit as radical as Sharron Angle’s or Christine O’Donnell’s.

It seems he wants to have his libertarian cake and eat it too. Perhaps Ron Paul needs call junior in for a talk.

BTW: There may be hope. Paul, unlike O'Donnell, hasn't ruled on masturbation, yet. wacko.gif

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post Sep 17 2010, 11:42 PM
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QUOTE(BoF @ Sep 17 2010, 05:49 PM) *
QUOTE(Gray Seal @ Sep 17 2010, 10:46 AM) *
The abortion issue is complicated.

Regardless of how complicated the abortion issue might be, Rand Paul is not the same “libertarian” as his father. In fact, I question his libertarian credentials. If he had his way, it would mean creating a police state regarding women’s reproductive rights.

Note his answers to a questionnaire by the Kentucky Right to Life Association Political Action Committee, particularly question No. 2 about exceptions for rape and incest.
http://c0469351.cdn.cloudfiles.rackspacecl...RTLresponse.pdf
(This is a pdf file)

Paul position is every bit as radical as Sharron Angle’s or Christine O’Donnell’s.

It seems he wants to have his libertarian cake and eat it too. Perhaps Ron Paul needs call junior in for a talk.

BTW: There may be hope. Paul, unlike O'Donnell, hasn't ruled on masturbation, yet. wacko.gif

Wacko, wacko, typical response for the supporter of the two-party system. Whatever happened to John Anderson?

This is how the media defines the candidates of freedom. Take a fringe issue, and turn it into a central topic. Let's take any issue, big or small, ask him/her about it, if the answer is not mainstream, let's only talk about that issue. Abortion, a debate that has been around for going on 50 years. Can we solve it yet? No, why, because we are not supposed to solve it, just argue about it. The captain of a sinking ships cries out to man the lifeboats, women AND children first, abortion makes us choose between women OR children. Why haven't you figured this out yet?

O'Donnell and masturbation, who gives a hoot? Apparently, those that are scared of O'Donnell's mainstream positions. More freedom? Oh no, that will mean people doing like....whatever they want? Can't have that. People really like her, let's make her seem crazy, we'll talk about masturbation. 70 year old women don't want to hear about people jerking it, they'll never vote for her. Let's run with that.

Can't you see what the media is doing? This woman is speaking out against the ruling class system and you are trying to figure out how to keep the ruling class in power. Hitler's words ring true today, "It is fortunate for leaders, that the masses do not think." Start using your brain and stop allowing your emotions and propaganda to sway your opinion, start with less TV.
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BoF
post Sep 18 2010, 12:02 AM
Post #37


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QUOTE(barnaby2341 @ Sep 17 2010, 06:42 PM) *
Whatever happened to John Anderson?

How to diffuse an obnoxious rant? Maybe with something equally obnoxious.

Do you mean this John Anderson or this one?

This post has been edited by BoF: Sep 18 2010, 12:04 AM
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WinePusher
post Sep 18 2010, 12:05 AM
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QUOTE
The problem I have with O'Donnell and others of her ilk is that her platform appears short on substantive solutions for energizing the economy and long on social issues. Being anti-condom for AIDS ridden regions is nutty, but I could give her a pass in that she probably wouldn't have an effect on programs such as that.


I agree that the Republican/Conservative message on re-energizing our economy has had a horrible PR failure. But Conservatives have made their case quite clear, stop spending and stop passing the tab to the next generation. Our debt is unsustainable, it began under Bush and continued under Obama and his Keynesian like policies.
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barnaby2341
post Sep 18 2010, 12:24 AM
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QUOTE(BoF @ Sep 17 2010, 07:02 PM) *
QUOTE(barnaby2341 @ Sep 17 2010, 06:42 PM) *
Whatever happened to John Anderson?

How to diffuse an obnoxious rant? Maybe with something equally obnoxious.

Do you mean this John Anderson or this one?

I'm referring to this John Anderson:

http://www.americasdebate.com/forums/index...erson&st=80, Post #100
QUOTE(BoF @ Jan 7 2008, 07:32 PM) *
This is just a quick note for leder and scubatim.

I understand fully why you would support Ron Paul. At one time I supported either Eugene McCarthy or Robert Kennedy instead of Hubert Humphrey. I voted for third party candidate John Anderson in 1980 and I thought Bill Bradley would have made a great candidate and president. It's sort of like I've been threre, done that.

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CruisingRam
post Sep 18 2010, 06:41 AM
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QUOTE(Raptavio @ Sep 15 2010, 09:17 AM) *
QUOTE(CruisingRam @ Sep 15 2010, 12:39 PM) *
QUOTE(Raptavio @ Sep 15 2010, 05:12 AM) *
As with the seven other sure-thing Republicans that have been defeated by Tea Party candidates, O'Donnell's victory turns what promised to be an easy R win into something else.

While Rubio in Florida and Paul in Kentucky may win, millions has to be spent to hold onto seats that oughtn't have been competitive. Murkowski entering as an independent is likely to throw Alaska's race into the D column (if she enters). Reid's sure loss now looks like a likely (but by no means guaranteed win) in Nevada. Colorado's governorship was a likely R win that's now a safe D.

The national GOP is pulling out of Delaware and what was a sure Republican pickup is now a safe Democratic hold, and with it, say the national Republicans, go their already slim hopes of taking over the Senate.

I am grateful to the Tea Party for softening the blow of what still promises to be a very tough midterm for Democrats. With one of the two houses of Congress safe, we're likely to see a lot more focus on protecting the other.


I predict an ® victory no matter what in Alaska. Only reason why Begich won against Stevens is because Stevens was too busy with his felony conviction at the time. rolleyes.gif

He would have even won with the conviction had he been able to spend the time campaigning instead of being in court rolleyes.gif

You have to know how corrupt the republican party is in Alaska and the average Alaskan's blind loyalty to the republican party.

No candidate is strong enough to knock off Miller right now, though it has reinvigorated the Dems, and money is starting to pour in, Heck, I can't even remember off hand who the democratic challenger is at this time. rolleyes.gif


Polls suggest a Democratic win in a three-way race. Murkowski can, in fact, split the Republican vote if she runs indie.


I am suprised, and wrong- Murkowski entered today as a write in- I guess I misjudged her love of her "home" state- Washington DC (she really grew up there, her dad being a lifer there as well) - most Alaskans thought she was going for the big bux at some point, work for the oil companies or banks or whatever.

http://www.adn.com/2010/09/17/1459578/murk...to-say-yes.html

This post has been edited by CruisingRam: Sep 18 2010, 06:47 AM
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