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> Tea Party win Delaware nomination, A victory for Democrats?
Julian
post Sep 15 2010, 12:03 PM
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Christine O'Donnell wins Delaware Republican Senate nomination

QUOTE
O'Donnell was the leader of the Christian lobby group Saviour's Alliance for Lifting the Truth. In a television interview a decade ago, she said: "The Bible says that lust in your heart is committing adultery. So you can't masturbate without lust."

She will now stand for the US Senate in November for the seat vacated by Joe Biden when he became vice-president two years ago.

Such is the anger among conservatives who think Obama is a socialist and the Republicans not rightwing enough that they were prepared to vote in O'Donnell, even though polls suggest she has little chance of beating the Democrats for the seat in November. The same polls suggested that Castle could win the traditionally Democratic state.


In the UK, for most of the last decade, the Conservative party (closest equivalent to the GOP) shifted rightwards, under pressure from their own right wing, after losing to the left-of-centre landslide in 1997 that put Tony Blair in power. This caused 13 years of electoral failure (small gains here and there, but generally poor performance on the national stage) until David Cameron took over a few years back, under whom they moved back towards the political centre and with whom they have now regained office (though only through coalition with the centrist Liberal Democrat party, moving the whole coalition somewhat further to the centre, at least in theory.)

Labour underwent a similar crisis of identity during the Thatcher years, when party loyalists moved the party further to the left, resulting in repeated failure to gain ground, which was only turned around when more moderate leadership made efforts to expel extremists (under Neil Kinnock) and move the party back toward the centre.

I wonder if something similar is not now happening to the Republicans. It seems to me that the battle for the soul of the party - between hard right grassroots activists, and more moderate leaders, which the hardliners seem to be winning at the moment - is not particularly attractive to a majority of voters. What point is there in winning an argument on the direction of the party if that direction is somewhere that voters don't want to go?

Is this win counter-prouctive for Delaware Republicans, Tea Party or not? Why, or why not? Edited to add: Or, is it a realignmnet of an out of touch elite with mainstream Republicanism?

Does a Tea Party Republican nominee, for House or Senate, stand a chance to win a seat in Congress? Who and where? Edited to add: If not, why not, and is that a problem for Republicanism or for the country?

Is the push to the right among Republicans, exemplified by the Tea Party, taking the rest of the country with it, or alienating middle of the road voters and leaving the political centre open for Democrat gains?


Edited to balance the debate questions a little better

This post has been edited by Julian: Sep 15 2010, 02:13 PM
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Dontreadonme
post Sep 15 2010, 12:38 PM
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Is this win counter-prouctive for Delaware Republicans, Tea Party or not? Why, or why not?

Christine "thou shall not masturbate" O'Donnell is polling well behind Democrat Chis Coons. Even Karl Rove stated "This is not a race we're going to be able to win." Of course this view may not be shared by all Republicans, lately many of them have been flocking to the tea party like lemmings to a cliff.

The GOP civil war is rather interesting to view from the sidelines.
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Raptavio
post Sep 15 2010, 02:12 PM
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As with the seven other sure-thing Republicans that have been defeated by Tea Party candidates, O'Donnell's victory turns what promised to be an easy R win into something else.

While Rubio in Florida and Paul in Kentucky may win, millions has to be spent to hold onto seats that oughtn't have been competitive. Murkowski entering as an independent is likely to throw Alaska's race into the D column (if she enters). Reid's sure loss now looks like a likely (but by no means guaranteed win) in Nevada. Colorado's governorship was a likely R win that's now a safe D.

The national GOP is pulling out of Delaware and what was a sure Republican pickup is now a safe Democratic hold, and with it, say the national Republicans, go their already slim hopes of taking over the Senate.

I am grateful to the Tea Party for softening the blow of what still promises to be a very tough midterm for Democrats. With one of the two houses of Congress safe, we're likely to see a lot more focus on protecting the other.
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Julian
post Sep 15 2010, 02:14 PM
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Please Note:
I edited the debate questions a little for balance after DTOM and Raptavio posted their first replies.
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CruisingRam
post Sep 15 2010, 05:39 PM
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QUOTE(Raptavio @ Sep 15 2010, 05:12 AM) *
As with the seven other sure-thing Republicans that have been defeated by Tea Party candidates, O'Donnell's victory turns what promised to be an easy R win into something else.

While Rubio in Florida and Paul in Kentucky may win, millions has to be spent to hold onto seats that oughtn't have been competitive. Murkowski entering as an independent is likely to throw Alaska's race into the D column (if she enters). Reid's sure loss now looks like a likely (but by no means guaranteed win) in Nevada. Colorado's governorship was a likely R win that's now a safe D.

The national GOP is pulling out of Delaware and what was a sure Republican pickup is now a safe Democratic hold, and with it, say the national Republicans, go their already slim hopes of taking over the Senate.

I am grateful to the Tea Party for softening the blow of what still promises to be a very tough midterm for Democrats. With one of the two houses of Congress safe, we're likely to see a lot more focus on protecting the other.


I predict an ® victory no matter what in Alaska. Only reason why Begich won against Stevens is because Stevens was too busy with his felony conviction at the time. rolleyes.gif

He would have even won with the conviction had he been able to spend the time campaigning instead of being in court rolleyes.gif

You have to know how corrupt the republican party is in Alaska and the average Alaskan's blind loyalty to the republican party.

No candidate is strong enough to knock off Miller right now, though it has reinvigorated the Dems, and money is starting to pour in, Heck, I can't even remember off hand who the democratic challenger is at this time. rolleyes.gif
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Raptavio
post Sep 15 2010, 06:17 PM
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QUOTE(CruisingRam @ Sep 15 2010, 12:39 PM) *
QUOTE(Raptavio @ Sep 15 2010, 05:12 AM) *
As with the seven other sure-thing Republicans that have been defeated by Tea Party candidates, O'Donnell's victory turns what promised to be an easy R win into something else.

While Rubio in Florida and Paul in Kentucky may win, millions has to be spent to hold onto seats that oughtn't have been competitive. Murkowski entering as an independent is likely to throw Alaska's race into the D column (if she enters). Reid's sure loss now looks like a likely (but by no means guaranteed win) in Nevada. Colorado's governorship was a likely R win that's now a safe D.

The national GOP is pulling out of Delaware and what was a sure Republican pickup is now a safe Democratic hold, and with it, say the national Republicans, go their already slim hopes of taking over the Senate.

I am grateful to the Tea Party for softening the blow of what still promises to be a very tough midterm for Democrats. With one of the two houses of Congress safe, we're likely to see a lot more focus on protecting the other.


I predict an victory no matter what in Alaska. Only reason why Begich won against Stevens is because Stevens was too busy with his felony conviction at the time. rolleyes.gif

He would have even won with the conviction had he been able to spend the time campaigning instead of being in court rolleyes.gif

You have to know how corrupt the republican party is in Alaska and the average Alaskan's blind loyalty to the republican party.

No candidate is strong enough to knock off Miller right now, though it has reinvigorated the Dems, and money is starting to pour in, Heck, I can't even remember off hand who the democratic challenger is at this time. rolleyes.gif


Polls suggest a Democratic win in a three-way race. Murkowski can, in fact, split the Republican vote if she runs indie.
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AuthorMusician
post Sep 15 2010, 09:37 PM
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Is the push to the right among Republicans, exemplified by the Tea Party, taking the rest of the country with it, or alienating middle of the road voters and leaving the political centre open for Democrat gains?

After checking out this news in the AM today, I pondered just what the heck this all means from the greater perspective, meaning not smarter, just zoomed out like a Google map.

I see the tea party types ripping the GOP in two, with the establishment being the target. Anti-establishment is the whole thing. It's funny. Palin at first begged for the tea party folks to join in with the weakened GOP, and now she seems to be at the forefront of dismantling the Party in favor of a bizarre political/philosophical mixture even stranger than Libertarianism.

For example, she recently Facebooked that burning the Koran was the same as building a mosque a couple blocks away from Ground Zero. Yeah? How so? I guess both are insults, and in that confused jumble of synaptic connections, that makes the two acts equal. Nevermind intent; nevermind property rights -- it's the same dang thing.

Similar to this is equating masturbation with adultery and fornication. Lust must be in the heart for both, ergo they are equal. Nevermind the lack of interpersonal connections (fondness, caring, love) or lack of body warmth or lack of curled hair or lack of so many things it's ridiculous. And why does real love making have to involve lust? That's just for the first time, which anyone knows who has actually had a real lover. In fact, the differences are so great that anyone who equates the two must never have had a real lover, just a frak buddy. Or maybe a self-loathing that runs so deep that any real love has long been drowned out of existence.

I do remember learning this during Catholic child brainwashing. Even at the tender age of eight years old, I knew it was entirely bogus. However, that was a broader principle . . . even the thought of committing a sin was the same as doing the sin.

Er, so why not just do the sin? Then go to confession and all is great, except for that bank you robbed or the person you killed or that enormous lie you told that destroyed someone's reputation and onward to infinity. They really thought I was stupid, you know?

Anywho, guess you can think all kinds of crazy things if you don't have to make any sense. It's our right as free citizens in a free country.

Well, back to politics. Come November, I bet the GOP base will loyally vote GOP, except for the ones who simply can't vote for THAT crazy person. They'll probably stay home or throw the mail-in ballot away. Will there be Obama Republicans? Not this time around, but perhaps in 2012. It depends on how the big issues pan out.

Will any of the tea party types win? I strongly doubt that, and so Democrats will not only retain majorities, the majorities will grow.

It'll be a kick in the pants to Fox News and all the other conventional-thinking political pundits, and a solid jolt to the jaw of the GOP. Now here's what is really going on:

The tea party types WANT to destroy the GOP in order to REBUILD it in their own image.

Okay, so that will be interesting. A bit scary, but interesting. It's a combination of Jesus complex, God complex, wishful thinking and selective denial. Fascinating psychology going on here.

This post has been edited by AuthorMusician: Sep 15 2010, 09:43 PM
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Curmudgeon
post Sep 15 2010, 11:45 PM
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Is this win counter-prouctive for Delaware Republicans, Tea Party or not? Why, or why not? Edited to add: Or, is it a realignmnet of an out of touch elite with mainstream Republicanism?

I think I listened to her victory speech as she spoke of Democrats trying to destroy our freedoms, but my mind was replaying the tapes of her opposition to Masturbation. What can I say? I've been wearing glasses for 46 years now... I don't want government spies intruding that deeply into my life, and calling it increased freedom.

This Sarah Palin look alike contributes nothing to American politics, and all that I can hope is that if she is elected; she follows Sarah Palin's example and decides that she really needs to spend time with her husband... Unfortunately, she has gained notoriety if not fame, and she will likely decide that she never had a need for her husband. Maybe there is a brief future for her, as a Sarah Palin look alike, collecting speaking fees for endorsing other Republican candidates!

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Jobius
post Sep 16 2010, 01:03 AM
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Is this win counter-prouctive for Delaware Republicans, Tea Party or not? Why, or why not? Edited to add: Or, is it a realignmnet of an out of touch elite with mainstream Republicanism?

Definitely counter-productive for the Republicans. It was always going to be hard for them to take the majority in the Senate, but it looked possible after Scott Brown's election in January. They still had to run the table, even in tough states like California and Delaware. Mike Castle was widely considered a RINO squish by the "true conservative" base, but he was electable. I don't see any way Christine O'Donnell can win in a state as blue as Delaware. We're about to see wall-to-wall anti-masturbation videos all over the news (and not just the Daily Show) for the next six weeks. She's doomed.

Does a Tea Party Republican nominee, for House or Senate, stand a chance to win a seat in Congress? Who and where? Edited to add: If not, why not, and is that a problem for Republicanism or for the country?

I think a lot of Tea Party Republicans can win, but it depends on who and where. Marco Rubio is a tea party favorite, and chased Charlie Crist out of the Florida GOP. He's also way ahead of Crist and Meek in the Senate race. Joe Miller has an excellent chance in Alaska. And don't forget that not all tea party supported candidates have been fire-breathing conservatives. Scott Brown is pretty moderate, and he got significant support from the tea party movement.

Is the push to the right among Republicans, exemplified by the Tea Party, taking the rest of the country with it, or alienating middle of the road voters and leaving the political centre open for Democrat gains?

Short term, I think it helps the GOP. The tea party movement is where all the energy on the right is right now. The focus on limited government and fiscal conservatism, and lack of emphasis on social issues like abortion and same sex marriage, is actually less alienating than "movement conservatism" has been in recent years. But who knows how these new faces will wear over time, assuming they get in to office.
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CruisingRam
post Sep 16 2010, 02:02 AM
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QUOTE(Raptavio @ Sep 15 2010, 09:17 AM) *
QUOTE(CruisingRam @ Sep 15 2010, 12:39 PM) *
QUOTE(Raptavio @ Sep 15 2010, 05:12 AM) *
As with the seven other sure-thing Republicans that have been defeated by Tea Party candidates, O'Donnell's victory turns what promised to be an easy R win into something else.

While Rubio in Florida and Paul in Kentucky may win, millions has to be spent to hold onto seats that oughtn't have been competitive. Murkowski entering as an independent is likely to throw Alaska's race into the D column (if she enters). Reid's sure loss now looks like a likely (but by no means guaranteed win) in Nevada. Colorado's governorship was a likely R win that's now a safe D.

The national GOP is pulling out of Delaware and what was a sure Republican pickup is now a safe Democratic hold, and with it, say the national Republicans, go their already slim hopes of taking over the Senate.

I am grateful to the Tea Party for softening the blow of what still promises to be a very tough midterm for Democrats. With one of the two houses of Congress safe, we're likely to see a lot more focus on protecting the other.


I predict an victory no matter what in Alaska. Only reason why Begich won against Stevens is because Stevens was too busy with his felony conviction at the time. rolleyes.gif

He would have even won with the conviction had he been able to spend the time campaigning instead of being in court rolleyes.gif

You have to know how corrupt the republican party is in Alaska and the average Alaskan's blind loyalty to the republican party.

No candidate is strong enough to knock off Miller right now, though it has reinvigorated the Dems, and money is starting to pour in, Heck, I can't even remember off hand who the democratic challenger is at this time. rolleyes.gif


Polls suggest a Democratic win in a three-way race. Murkowski can, in fact, split the Republican vote if she runs indie.


I doubt she will enter- we will know on Friday. Alaskans keep on electing Don Young as well- and he is well known to be corrupt, and no one even likes the guy- still wins handily- Alaska is possibly the most "red" state in the Union.
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Paladin Elspeth
post Sep 16 2010, 03:56 AM
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QUOTE(CruisingRam)
I doubt she will enter- we will know on Friday. Alaskans keep on electing Don Young as well- and he is well known to be corrupt, and no one even likes the guy- still wins handily- Alaska is possibly the most "red" state in the Union.

Murkowski is exploring the possibility of a write-in campaign. Guess we'll find out soon enough.

The more "Tea Party" candidates rail against extending unemployment benefits for workers who lost their jobs through no fault of their own, threaten to end Social Security and Medicare, favor forcing women to bear the children of rapists, and (Heavens to Betsy!) take a public stance against masturbation ( rolleyes.gif ), the more Democrats stand to win even in this climate of anti-incumbent fervor.

The Republican Party is definitely having problems. It used to be the Religious right; now it's the Tea Party saying that the GOP isn't conservative enough. But how much conservatism does the country really want right now?

This post has been edited by Paladin Elspeth: Sep 16 2010, 04:10 AM
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akaCG
post Sep 16 2010, 01:32 PM
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Last night, I went to bed comfortable in the knowledge that the Democrats would receive an even more severe electoral drubbing than they got in '94.

This morning, I woke up to an email sent to me by a friend, in which she linked the following LA Times article:

QUOTE
...
In what was billed as a "major announcement," the Democratic National Committee on Wednesday unveiled not a new policy platform, but a new logo ...
...
"This new identity for our party captures the spirit that unites us all. Democrats -- all of us -- are working for the change that matters," DNC Chairman Tim Kaine wrote in a blog post announcing the change.
...
The logo also has a circular shape that resembles Obama's campaign logo, as does the color scheme. Gone is the American flag and the familiar donkey.
...

Link: http://www.latimes.com/news/politics/la-pn...0,3314861.story

What a stroke of sheer genius! A big, bold, baby blue "D". What exquisitely elegant simplicity! And the shedding the American flag move? What could possibly be more inspirational than that?

I'm gonna have to seriously start reassessing the outcome of the elections now. Oh, who am I kidding? It's over. I might as well just start packing and join Alec Baldwin et al. in France.
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Lesly
post Sep 16 2010, 03:08 PM
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Does a Tea Party Republican nominee, for House or Senate, stand a chance to win a seat in Congress?
At this point it depends on how strongly the candidates identify as teabaggers v. establishment conservatives, but I suspect the results will boil down to enthusiasm, not policy. Liberals have no reason to vote; conservatives don't need a reason to vote. This morning the news is Elizabeth Warren's nomination to head the new consumer financial services protection agency has been downgraded to special advisor to Tim Geithner, bailout hack extraordinaire. Yeah, I'll definitely be skipping politicians at the voting booth and stick with amendments and levies.

I'm not following teabaggers closely. I hear they don't care for social conservatism as much. But then you have people like O'Donnell and Paladino running for office, and I wonder if the deniers read the same things I do. (Paladino doesn't mind forwarding emails with pictures that include beastiality and painting Obama's inaguaration like a Zulu party during working hours, but he opposes Cordoba and gay marriage. That's unconscionable.)

If teabaggers win they will either be coopted by spend and borrow, movement consertives, etc., or they will clash with establishment conservatives. I don't think those angry with the current party appreciate how million/billionaires like the Kochs are funding their own movement. If current financial/economic policy remains unchallenged, the rich will need another bailout.

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Jobius
post Sep 16 2010, 08:21 PM
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I want to add a little more detail on this question:
Does a Tea Party Republican nominee, for House or Senate, stand a chance to win a seat in Congress? Who and where?

Let's just consider the Senate races where the establishment-supported candidate lost to a tea party candidate:

Mike Lee, UT, beat incumbent Bob Bennet
Pat Toomey, PA, chased incumbent Arlen Specter out of the GOP primary
Marco Rubio, FL, did the same to governor Charlie Crist
Joe Miller, AK, beat incumbent Lisa Murkowski
Rand Paul, KY, beat secretary of state Trey Grayson
Christine O'Donnell, DE, beat at-large congressman Mike Castle

Of those, 5 out of 6 have a good chance to win a seat in the Senate. Delaware looks like the anomaly. A lot of tea-party insurgents lost their primaries to more "establishment" Republicans in blue-to-purple states (New Hampshire, California, Illinois, probably more I can't think of right now). I'm not sure how to call Nevada, where the "establishment" Republican became known as the chickens-for-health-care lady before losing to Sharron Angle. Angle has said things that are even crazier, but Harry Reid is unpopular enough that she might just Daschle him.
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WinePusher
post Sep 17 2010, 12:39 AM
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QUOTE(Curmudgeon @ Sep 15 2010, 03:45 PM) *
I think I listened to her victory speech as she spoke of Democrats trying to destroy our freedoms, but my mind was replaying the tapes of her opposition to Masturbation. What can I say?


I would regard this soundbite as akin to when the Speaker of the House of Representatives stated that birth control would help stimulate the economy.

QUOTE
Is this win counter-prouctive for Delaware Republicans, Tea Party or not? Why, or why not? Edited to add: Or, is it a realignmnet of an out of touch elite with mainstream Republicanism?


I think it is great for the republican party in Delaware. The republican party once stood for conservative, small government principles but unfortunatly strayed from these principles. It's not time for the party to moderate but rather go back to their conservative roots

QUOTE
Does a Tea Party Republican nominee, for House or Senate, stand a chance to win a seat in Congress? Who and where? Edited to add: If not, why not, and is that a problem for Republicanism or for the country?


Hard to predict. The Tea Party has been upsetting many establishement republican races so there is a very good possibility that it will be an influential organization come November 2.

QUOTE
Is the push to the right among Republicans, exemplified by the Tea Party, taking the rest of the country with it, or alienating middle of the road voters and leaving the political centre open for Democrat gains?


This country is a center right country, polls from gallop and rassmusen have shown this repeatedly. When the republican party runs conservative candidates, they win. In 2008, we didn't run a conservative and we had just come out of presidency that was not to the right.
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post Sep 17 2010, 06:38 AM
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Christine O'Donnell wins Delaware Republican Senate nomination.

Is this win counter-prouctive for Delaware Republicans, Tea Party or not?


I woke up to what I thought was an April Fool's Day version of the news to hear that Christine O'Donnell believes scientists have developed mice with fully functioning human brains.

My mind went through the logical premises of a pro-life Republican protecting the lives of mice with fully functioning human brains:
Men would have to stop building better mouse traps.
Cats would need to be outlawed.

I need to go to the Internet and verify...

QUOTE(Christine O'Donnell)
They are -- they are doing that here in the United States. American scientific companies are cross-breeding humans and animals and coming up with mice with fully functioning human brains. So they're already into this experiment. TPMDC

Karl Rove stated that he stood by the endorsement that he provided for her immediately after the Primary Election results were declared. It took a few hours for the realization to sink in, that had he provided that endorsement for her before the Primary Election, it might have had a different outcome. Nope. It's not April Fools Day... This win is just counter-productive for American Politics.

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Dontreadonme
post Sep 17 2010, 11:25 AM
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QUOTE(winepusher @ Sep 16 2010, 08:39 PM) *
The republican party once stood for conservative, small government principles but unfortunatly strayed from these principles. It's not time for the party to moderate but rather go back to their conservative roots


The problem I have with O'Donnell and others of her ilk is that her platform appears short on substantive solutions for energizing the economy and long on social issues. Being anti-condom for AIDS ridden regions is nutty, but I could give her a pass in that she probably wouldn't have an effect on programs such as that. But when she states:

"it was a misconception that you, quote unquote, can't legislate morality."

The reality of that statement is that if you don't legislate one morality then you are legislating somebody else's morality," she said. "So you can't get around legislating morality."


Does she not understand the concept that legislating a moral point of view that takes away from some citizens freedom of action is not equal to legislation that doesn't?

The fact that Sarah Palin is advising her to only speak through Fox news and that she apparently won't debate Chris Coons without receiving the questions beforehand further detracts from what luster she has.

Oh crap, there I went....I used a word that had 'lust' in it......

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Raptavio
post Sep 17 2010, 02:37 PM
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QUOTE(Dontreadonme @ Sep 17 2010, 06:25 AM) *
QUOTE(winepusher @ Sep 16 2010, 08:39 PM) *
The republican party once stood for conservative, small government principles but unfortunatly strayed from these principles. It's not time for the party to moderate but rather go back to their conservative roots


The problem I have with O'Donnell and others of her ilk is that her platform appears short on substantive solutions for energizing the economy and long on social issues. Being anti-condom for AIDS ridden regions is nutty, but I could give her a pass in that she probably wouldn't have an effect on programs such as that. But when she states:

"it was a misconception that you, quote unquote, can't legislate morality."

The reality of that statement is that if you don't legislate one morality then you are legislating somebody else's morality," she said. "So you can't get around legislating morality."


Does she not understand the concept that legislating a moral point of view that takes away from some citizens freedom of action is not equal to legislation that doesn't?

The fact that Sarah Palin is advising her to only speak through Fox news and that she apparently won't debate Chris Coons without receiving the questions beforehand further detracts from what luster she has.

Oh crap, there I went....I used a word that had 'lust' in it......



Well said.

Although winepusher's remarks so far have been little more than regurgitated talking points (I hope to see his arguments fleshed out in greater detail as he continues to post here), one of them - the whole concept of conservatism being 'small government' - deserves a rebuttal.

As dtom alluded to, most of these so-called "small government" conservatives, with notable exceptions like Ron Paul who truly IS a small-government conservative, are all about expanding the reach of government in military size and aggression, and in intrusion into our bedrooms. O'Donnell and at least four other Republican Senate candidates have all, for example, signed on to an anti-abortion plan that would not even allow a woman to terminate a pregnancy if she were raped by her own father, had severe gestational diabetes and the fetus had profound spina bifida. They strongly support legislating and enforcing personal morality and the expenditure of tax dollars to promote their faith. "Small government", to these 'conservatives', means cutting welfare, social security, and other such programs that benefit the most vulnerable among us.

Their extreme views may, at best, be ignored this cycle by the traditional media, currently running with a different narrative. When their extremism has had time to be examined by the American people, it will not end well.

And this is, by the way, REAL extremism, not the complete "Obama's a Marxist" bunk that FOX news tries to foist.
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AuthorMusician
post Sep 17 2010, 02:41 PM
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QUOTE(Dontreadonme @ Sep 17 2010, 07:25 AM) *
QUOTE(winepusher @ Sep 16 2010, 08:39 PM) *
The republican party once stood for conservative, small government principles but unfortunatly strayed from these principles. It's not time for the party to moderate but rather go back to their conservative roots


The problem I have with O'Donnell and others of her ilk is that her platform appears short on substantive solutions for energizing the economy and long on social issues. Being anti-condom for AIDS ridden regions is nutty, but I could give her a pass in that she probably wouldn't have an effect on programs such as that. But when she states:

"it was a misconception that you, quote unquote, can't legislate morality."

The reality of that statement is that if you don't legislate one morality then you are legislating somebody else's morality," she said. "So you can't get around legislating morality."


Does she not understand the concept that legislating a moral point of view that takes away from some citizens freedom of action is not equal to legislation that doesn't?

The fact that Sarah Palin is advising her to only speak through Fox news and that she apparently won't debate Chris Coons without receiving the questions beforehand further detracts from what luster she has.

Oh crap, there I went....I used a word that had 'lust' in it......


Bad dog! Lustering in your heart and all that. Stop it right now!

Think I've figured it out. O'Donnell now believes she's going to be the next Republican Pop Star. Whether she wins or loses, there'll be a fat book deal, signing tours and hefty speaking fees. Her life of constantly scraping for a living is nearly over.

With that in mind, she might want to tone down that thing about masturbation. Also tone up the bod and wear sexier clothes. She's got the hair, the doll face and the voice. Makeover time! Must appeal to the base of dirty old men lustering in their hearts.

It was funny how Republicans & minions reacted. WTF? But now it's okay. What a difference a day makes.

Here's a sobering thought: We may be looking at a future Secretary of State. As much as that would entertain me, I can't help but shudder.
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Gray Seal
post Sep 17 2010, 02:42 PM
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One thing which needs reminding is that there is diversity in the tea party. Palin is the quasi representative of the repackaged neo-con aspect of the tea party. O' Donnell appears to be from this wing. The other faction in the tea party has the quasi representative of Ron Paul. This aspect wants smaller government, limited federal duties, and a non-offensive military. O' Donnell does not show much for many tea party folks to cheer about.

The Republican Party does not have much to offer if it clings to its recent history of big government, offensive use of the military, and social conservatism thrust upon people via central government. Neither O' Donnell nor Castle represent a change in direction for the Republican Party.

I think the Democratic Party is very comfortable with O' Donnell. They are not at all comfortable with the Ron Paul faction of the tea party. There is a concerted effort to paint the entire tea party with one brush, the color the big government beneficiaries wish the public to see. The last thing Democrats wish to discuss is the Ron Paul perspective. O' Donnell gives them an easy opponent which does not challenge the status quo, win or lose.
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