logo 
spacer
  

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

If you have an opinion, you should share it! Register Now!

America's Debate hosts the best in news, government, and political debate. Register now to take part in the most civil and constructive debate on the Internet. Join the community, and get ready to be challenged!

Click here to start

> Sponsored Links

Register to remove these ads!
> This mid-term- the usual mid-term, or revolution?, Real mandate or no?
CruisingRam
post Nov 3 2010, 07:49 AM
Post #1


**********
Elite Senior Contributor

Group: Members
Posts: 7,934
Member No.: 927
Joined: July-25-03

From: Hawaii
Gender: Male
Politics: Liberal
Party affiliation: Other



Well, the dems kep the Senate, repubs got the house. Every candidate that was closely aligned with Sarah Palin went on to defeat- Fiorna, Whitman, Miller, O'Donnel and Angle. Candidates that distanced themselves from the tea party or at least did thier best to not make any unscripted public appearences (Rand Paul in this case)

So, given the history of mid-term elections, is this business as usual for a mid-term or a revolution the right wing predicted, or even a mandate?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
3 Pages V   1 2 3 >  
Start new topic
Replies (1 - 19)
AuthorMusician
post Nov 3 2010, 12:45 PM
Post #2


**********
Glasses and journalism work for me.

Sponsor
November 2003

Group: Sponsors
Posts: 6,346
Member No.: 297
Joined: December-1-02

From: Blueberry Hill
Gender: Male
Politics: Liberal
Party affiliation: Democrat



Oh boy, I get to give a concession statement!

I was wrong. It didn't work out like I thought, which is disappointing because conventional wisdom turned out right in the end. Darn it, I thought things had changed more than they have. Oh well, not exactly a crushing blow to my ego or anything, but a nice reassurance that I'm not psychic! So I can stop worrying about these other visions I've had.

So what comes next? Bills will be pumped through in the lame duck session. That's what usually happens. The Republicans might as well not run in 2012. The conventional wisdom says that President Obama is assured a second term. And going by what the Republicans did last time, government will be shut down for a while, and people will be reminded what that is like.

Basically, politics have become boring again. The same old patterns have returned. But wait, Buck and Bennet are still neck-to-neck, unless the info I'm looking at (Google News) is out of date. Colorado got Hick for governor. Local politics have remained the same after what happened in, if I remember the year right, the 2002 swing away from Red to Blue.

So. Hmm, maybe this is a bellweather for the nation. One more dance for the Republicans before they become a permanent minority voice? Could happen. Ah well, this time around I'm not making any predictions, which is fine. What difference could that make? None that I can see.

Meanwhile, it's still okay to poke holes in bad arguments. Ah, more fun coming up!

Oh yeah, time for another round of the Impeachment Rag. Can't wait. I can hear the droning voices already.

For the Democrats who thought this would happen and it did, my condolences. Bummer!

For the Republicans who thought this would happen and it did, congratulations. Yippee!

For the tea party types, you guys might want to try something else to foment change. I have no advice, nor do I know what else to say other than there's obviously something wrong with the approach. The red meat handed to the Republican base in the primaries didn't work, so that might be a place to start. Try not to say stuff that has to be taken back during the general elections.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Raptavio
post Nov 3 2010, 12:51 PM
Post #3


*********
Advanced Senior Contributor

Group: Members
Posts: 3,515
Member No.: 10,458
Joined: April-27-09

From: Rosemount, MN
Gender: Male
Politics: Very Liberal
Party affiliation: Democrat



Major victories in by the opposition party in the midterms of a President's first term happened n 1982 and 1994. How'd that work out for the opposition two years later?

I'm very thankful for the Tea Party. Thanks to them, what would have been a loss of BOTH houses turned into a loss of only one. Delaware and Nevada should have been easy GOP pickups, but the Tea Party's nominees sunk it.

Also Palin's endorsement seems to be poison -- not the best bellwether for a presumptive leading 2012 GOP Presidential candidate.

Losses in the House seem to be disproportionately in the Blue Dog caucus, which is good.

Here in MN, it sucks that GOP took the State legislatures, but the formality of a recount aside, the Dems retook the governor's seat for the first time in 20 years, and we swept the statewide offices. Unfortunately the odious Bachmann coasted to reelection.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
JohnfrmCleveland
post Nov 3 2010, 03:22 PM
Post #4


********
Master Debater

Sponsor
September 2009

Group: Sponsors
Posts: 2,457
Member No.: 8,090
Joined: November-1-07

From: Cleveland, OH
Gender: Male
Politics: Very Liberal
Party affiliation: None



So, given the history of mid-term elections, is this business as usual for a mid-term or a revolution the right wing predicted, or even a mandate?

I agree with what David Frum said on Colbert last night - people were voting against pain. Conditions are still bad for a lot of people, so they blamed the Democrats. But they didn't vote for anything. There is no sensible message or plan by the Republicans or the Tea Party (if you care to distinguish the two), just more railing against spending and government in general, but no solutions forthcoming, unless you are a rich guy in need of a tax cut.

People have short memories, I guess. Just two short years ago, there was serious talk about another Depression. Now, even with things far more stable, people are blaming Obama and the Democrats, rather than breathing a sigh of relief.
___________________________

Here in Ohio, people are no smarter. We're just a few years out from of a period of corrupt, incompetent Republican rule (Taft), and now the same bunch is supposed to save us from economic ruin. We'll see.

The change that was needed was here in heavily Democratic Cuyahoga County (Cleveland), where the entrenched Democrats were as corrupt as entrenched politicians can get. So the voters picked a new group of Democrats. The surnames Russo and Gallagher are still magic here, even though one of the main crooks in our corruption scandal was Frank Russo.

The one bright spot was that in my town, our school levy passed. But that was a struggle, even though the people here are loaded.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
AuthorMusician
post Nov 3 2010, 03:54 PM
Post #5


**********
Glasses and journalism work for me.

Sponsor
November 2003

Group: Sponsors
Posts: 6,346
Member No.: 297
Joined: December-1-02

From: Blueberry Hill
Gender: Male
Politics: Liberal
Party affiliation: Democrat



QUOTE(Raptavio @ Nov 3 2010, 08:51 AM) *
Major victories in by the opposition party in the midterms of a President's first term happened n 1982 and 1994. How'd that work out for the opposition two years later?

I'm very thankful for the Tea Party. Thanks to them, what would have been a loss of BOTH houses turned into a loss of only one. Delaware and Nevada should have been easy GOP pickups, but the Tea Party's nominees sunk it.

Also Palin's endorsement seems to be poison -- not the best bellwether for a presumptive leading 2012 GOP Presidential candidate.

Losses in the House seem to be disproportionately in the Blue Dog caucus, which is good.

Here in MN, it sucks that GOP took the State legislatures, but the formality of a recount aside, the Dems retook the governor's seat for the first time in 20 years, and we swept the statewide offices. Unfortunately the odious Bachmann coasted to reelection.


Ah, fewer blue pooches. Didn't consider that bit of good news.

Bachmann's back? Good! She is a great voice for the faction of crazy talkers. Really makes good old MN look bad though. I know you guys aren't as stupid, what with the Mao Clinic, U of M and TC high tech.

I heard a speculation that Rand Paul may single-handedly cause the US to default on its loans. This in turn could shove the world into a big depression. Worst case scenario? I don't know, it'd be probably the most significant political boondoggle in history. Don't think it's going to happen because so much is at stake.

But it could, and here we are just waiting on a single Senator to block raising the debt ceiling through filibuster. But then, could the Senate mount 60 votes out of the threat? That would be a significant step toward compromise.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
BoF
post Nov 3 2010, 04:21 PM
Post #6


**********
Giga-bite: "I catch mice & rats - 2 & 4 legs."

Sponsor
October 2004

Group: Sponsors
Posts: 6,126
Member No.: 3,423
Joined: August-14-04

From: Texas
Gender: Male
Politics: Liberal
Party affiliation: Democrat



QUOTE(CruisingRam @ Nov 3 2010, 02:49 AM) *
Well, the dems kep the Senate, repubs got the house. Every candidate that was closely aligned with Sarah Palin went on to defeat- Fiorna, Whitman, Miller, O'Donnel and Angle. Candidates that distanced themselves from the tea party or at least did thier best to not make any unscripted public appearences (Rand Paul in this case)

So, given the history of mid-term elections, is this business as usual for a mid-term or a revolution the right wing predicted, or even a mandate?

Joe Miller's loss must really cause Sarah Palin pain. I am not a sadist, but where pain is deserved, I have no problem with it being inflicted. Palin deserves a lot of it.

Write-in candidate, current Sen. Lisa Murkowsk is leading Palin backed Joe Miller 41% to 34%. Yeah, itís still a Republican seat, but a loss for Palin. Thatís a measure of consolation, especially since it happened in Palin's own backyard or perhaps that porch from which she can view Russia. How's that getting your nose rubbed in it thingy working out for you Sarah? devil.gif
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101103/ap_on_...s_alaska_senate

BTW: I never fully appreciated the boardís profanity filter until reading some of the stuff Yahoo readers posted. Thanks Jaime and Mike.

This post has been edited by BoF: Nov 3 2010, 04:54 PM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
akaCG
post Nov 3 2010, 06:46 PM
Post #7


*********
Advanced Senior Contributor

Sponsor
August 2012

Group: Sponsors
Posts: 4,846
Member No.: 10,787
Joined: November-25-09

Gender: Male
Politics: Conservative
Party affiliation: Independent



QUOTE(Raptavio @ Nov 3 2010, 08:51 AM) *
...
Also Palin's endorsement seems to be poison -- not the best bellwether for a presumptive leading 2012 GOP Presidential candidate.
...

Not quite. Of the 43 House candidates she endorsed, 30 won, with nine races still undecided. Of the Senate candidates she endorsed, 7 won.

Wanna see "poison"? Check out the win/loss record of the DailyKos "Orange To Blue" hand-picked candidates:

Senate:
1 win: Coons (DE)
4 losses: McAdams (AK); Sestak (PA); Conway (KY); Halter (AR)

House:
2 wins: Grijalva (AZ-7); Hanabusa (HI-1)
5 losses: Grayson (FL-8); DelBene (WA-8); McLane Kuster (NH-2); Garcia (Fl-25); Trivedi (PA-6)

QUOTE(Raptavio @ Nov 3 2010, 08:51 AM) *
...
Here in MN, it sucks that GOP took the State legislatures, ...
...

The GOP state-level tidal wave swept not just through Minnesota, but ...:
QUOTE
...
Republicans made huge gains in state legislative races and are at their highest point since 1928.

The Alabama House and Senate, Indiana House, Iowa House, Maine House and Senate, Michigan House, Minnesota House and Senate, Montana House, New Hampshire House and Senate, North Carolina House and Senate, Ohio House--a big redistricting win--the Pennsylvania House, and the Wisconsin Assembly and Senate all have flipped from Democrat to Republican.

This is the first time in Alabama that Republicans have controlled the legislature since reconstruction. The North Carolina Senate has not been Republican since 1870. And Republicans have reportedly taken over 100 seats in the New Hampshire House. For the first time in history, the Minnesota Senate will be controlled by the GOP.
...

Link: http://www.ncsl.org/tabid/21253/default.aspx

This post has been edited by akaCG: Nov 3 2010, 06:36 PM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
CruisingRam
post Nov 3 2010, 07:00 PM
Post #8


**********
Elite Senior Contributor

Group: Members
Posts: 7,934
Member No.: 927
Joined: July-25-03

From: Hawaii
Gender: Male
Politics: Liberal
Party affiliation: Other



To be fair- I predicted early on that McAdams didn't have a chance in Alaska- way to red a state, you could literally put a convicted pedophile in the republican ticket against jesus as a democrat and still get an R win there.

Reagan consistantly lost in mid-terms, so did Clinton akaCG, where both of those losses referendums on the sitting president? After all, they both won second terms, easily.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Fife and Drum
post Nov 3 2010, 07:01 PM
Post #9


******
Senior Contributor

Sponsor
February 2004

Group: Sponsors
Posts: 480
Member No.: 2,098
Joined: December-30-03

From: Louie Ville KY
Gender: Male
Politics: Slightly Conservative
Party affiliation: Democrat



QUOTE(AuthorMusician @ Nov 3 2010, 11:54 AM) *
I heard a speculation that Rand Paul may single-handedly cause the US to default on its loans. This in turn could shove the world into a big depression. Worst case scenario? I don't know, it'd be probably the most significant political boondoggle in history.
On behalf of the Sanity and Progress Coalition, The Bluegrass chapter, I want to apologize for Rand Paul winning. Have sent my congratulatory note to The Last Frontier, The First State and The Silver State chapters.

So, given the history of mid-term elections, is this business as usual for a mid-term or a revolution the right wing predicted, or even a mandate?

Looking at Jefferson County (Louisville) you can see where voters jumped party lines and voted R for the mayor (who lost) but crossed over and voted D for the US rep incumbent (Yarmouth). Same held true in Fayette County (Lexington), incumbent US rep Ben Chandler won in a close battle. Looking at precinct level results its apparent voters pulled the lever for Rand Paul but jumped over and voted for Chandler. Letís call it mandate-ish.

But hereís what the freshman senator from Florida had to say: ďWe make a great mistake if we believe that tonight these results are somehow an embrace of the Republican Party.Ē

Rubio the Rebel, getting all Mavericky on the mandate.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Raptavio
post Nov 3 2010, 07:47 PM
Post #10


*********
Advanced Senior Contributor

Group: Members
Posts: 3,515
Member No.: 10,458
Joined: April-27-09

From: Rosemount, MN
Gender: Male
Politics: Very Liberal
Party affiliation: Democrat



QUOTE(akaCG @ Nov 3 2010, 01:46 PM) *
QUOTE(Raptavio @ Nov 3 2010, 08:51 AM) *
...
Also Palin's endorsement seems to be poison -- not the best bellwether for a presumptive leading 2012 GOP Presidential candidate.
...

Not quite. Of the 43 House candidates she endorsed, 30 won, with nine races still undecided. Of the Senate candidates she endorsed, 7 won.


Now separate out the races where there was ever any doubt of a GOP win. Heck, I could have 'endorsed' races and ensured 100% return - uh, I endorse Schumer, Leahy, Inouye, Cantor, Boehner, Ellison, McCollum, Rubio....

What is particularly delightful is that many of her nominees turned out to be laughingstocks -- Paladino, Miller, O'Donnell, Angle, Tancredo -- and that's heartening.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
aevans176
post Nov 3 2010, 08:26 PM
Post #11


********
Millennium Mark

Group: Members
Posts: 1,931
Member No.: 3,607
Joined: September-13-04

From: Plano, TX. Sweater vest and Volvo hell.
Gender: Male
Politics: Conservative
Party affiliation: None



QUOTE(CruisingRam @ Nov 3 2010, 02:00 PM) *
Reagan consistantly lost in mid-terms, so did Clinton akaCG, where both of those losses referendums on the sitting president? After all, they both won second terms, easily.


All other partisan name calling and absurd rants aside... this is true. It's sort of the nature of the American voter, disenfranchised and ignorant and ready to blame anyone who's in office. When there is discord or turmoil (as during Reagan's mid terms) in the US, people want to change their "brand" of politics.

Frankly- Obama's success with Republicans in the driver's seat in the House may dictate how the next election goes for him (or not... look at his record or lack there of before he hit the White House!).

Good, bad, or indifferent, this is often how mid-term elections happen. Remember also that there are 2 more years before another "vote" on the direction of America. I personally am hopeful that this shift brings balance to the agenda of Washington, but honestly believe that 8 in 10 politicians are snake oil salesmen and bent on selling is a "bag of goods".

QUOTE(Raptavio)
Major victories in by the opposition party in the midterms of a President's first term happened n 1982 and 1994. How'd that work out for the opposition two years later?


Please reference the political pendulum over the last 20 years. This "ebb and flow" is consistent. It's almost like clockwork.

So long as we can get political figures like Rickey Smiley (did y'all hear his morning show today?) to stop perpetuating racist and conspiracy driven ideas... we'll all be fine.
(yes- this morning he was talking about how Black people needed to stand up for Obama because Republicans now were going to try to impeach the President, etc...)
For some people partisan politics and race-baiting will never end... UGH...

On another note.
The Ignorant American Voter rides again... Eddie Bernice Johnson was re-elected, even after literally stealing thousands in scholarship money and giving it to her family. Absurd.
It speaks volumes about the people in her district... party aside.
http://www.thenewamerican.com/index.php/us...dal-hole-deeper
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Dontreadonme
post Nov 3 2010, 09:13 PM
Post #12


Group Icon

**********
I think, therefore I am an enemy of the State....and Fox News

Sponsor
October 2003

Group: Moderators
Posts: 6,452
Member No.: 359
Joined: December-25-02

From: Nestled in the Shenandoah
Gender: Male
Politics: Independent
Party affiliation: Libertarian



I think the election turned out as anyone could have predicted.

As Libertarian who places freedom and liberty over party identification and rhetoric, I'm fairly disappointed after every election. But in the case of legislative dominance by the GOP and the Democrats: the Congress that governs least is the Congress that governs best.

With any luck, each party will be so hell bent on continuing to malign each other that they won't steal away any more of my money or my liberty.

....yes.....I know I'll be disappointed again.....
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Belshazzar
post Nov 4 2010, 12:05 AM
Post #13


*******
Five Hundred Club

Group: Members
Posts: 634
Member No.: 11,406
Joined: October-14-10

From: New Yawwwk
Gender: Male
Politics: Independent
Party affiliation: None



So, given the history of mid-term elections, is this business as usual for a mid-term or a revolution the right wing predicted, or even a mandate?

Whether or not its right, Obama now bears responsibility for the nation's economic conditions in the eyes of many. As Boehner said, this was a message to "change course," but not necessarily an endorsement of the GOP (as the Rubio quote above states). I believe this was a critical election, but just how critical remains to be seen until 2012. Critical elections tend to be driven by new voter turnout and the Tea Party did the job for the GOP in terms of registering new voters. The Republican Party is moving to the right and pulling the Democrats with them -- notice how many Democrats distanced themselves from the lighting rod that was ObamaCare. However, the fact that the GOP only took the House puts a big question mark over 2012. Elections tend to be a passing of a political hot potato from one party to another, so it will be difficult to see who gets the blame or credit for what policies and results over the next two years. If things start going better, will Obama or the newly minted GOP House get the credit? If things start going to hell in a handbasket, who gets the blame? Those questions will probably determine 2012.

QUOTE
The Ignorant American Voter rides again... Eddie Bernice Johnson was re-elected, even after literally stealing thousands in scholarship money and giving it to her family. Absurd.


And Charlie Rangel got re-elected with with 81% of the vote.

This post has been edited by Belshazzar: Nov 4 2010, 01:37 AM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
pheeler
post Nov 4 2010, 12:16 AM
Post #14


*******
Professional Chem Nerd

Sponsor
October 2003

Group: Sponsors
Posts: 557
Member No.: 925
Joined: July-25-03

From: Fort Collins, CO
Gender: Male
Politics: Slightly Liberal
Party affiliation: Democrat



QUOTE(akaCG @ Nov 3 2010, 10:46 AM) *

You linked the page my wife was working on til 2AM last night! She works at NCSL in Denver.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
akaCG
post Nov 4 2010, 12:48 AM
Post #15


*********
Advanced Senior Contributor

Sponsor
August 2012

Group: Sponsors
Posts: 4,846
Member No.: 10,787
Joined: November-25-09

Gender: Male
Politics: Conservative
Party affiliation: Independent



QUOTE(pheeler @ Nov 3 2010, 08:16 PM) *
QUOTE(akaCG @ Nov 3 2010, 10:46 AM) *

You linked the page my wife was working on til 2AM last night! She works at NCSL in Denver.

Wow. What a small world it is, eh?

BTW, I've been rummaging around that site today. Your wife and her colleagues do really good work. The site is now in my bookmarks.

ps:
Check your PM when you have a moment.

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Curmudgeon
post Nov 4 2010, 01:46 AM
Post #16


********
I am an unpaid protester!

Sponsor
August 1, 2003

Group: Sponsors
Posts: 1,191
Member No.: 729
Joined: May-14-03

From: Michigan
Gender: Male
Politics: Liberal
Party affiliation: Democrat



The Muskegon Chronicle had an interesting headline on our local elections. Unforunately, I was not able to link to the story...

Elected locally were:

Geoff Hansen: State Senate
Marcia Hovey-Wright: State Representative
Holly Hughes: State Representative
Bill Huizenga: Replacing Pete Hoekstra in the U.S. House of Representatives

More when I've found an effective anti-depressant...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Hobbes
post Nov 4 2010, 02:14 AM
Post #17


Group Icon

**********
No More Mr. Nice Guy!

Group: Committee Members
Posts: 5,311
Member No.: 1,155
Joined: September-8-03

From: Dallas, TX
Gender: Male
Politics: Conservative
Party affiliation: Independent



So, given the history of mid-term elections, is this business as usual for a mid-term or a revolution the right wing predicted, or even a mandate?

Given the magnitude of the change, I don't think you can classify it as business as usual. However, given some of the Senate races swinging back to Democrats, I don't think you can call it a revolution, either. Exit polls were fairly consistent in describing concern about spending/deficit/direction as the reason for the votes that went the Republican's way, so I think you can say that it was a mandate, especially in the House--those votes could easily swing the other way if voters don't like how things are going in a couple of years.

What will come of all this? I suspect not alot. Attempts to curb spending/repeal Obamacare will generate press, but not much else. Obama will probably have to work with Republicans to get any of his agenda passed, which might not be a bad thing. I'm most curious to see what happens in the Senate. They struggled getting things passed with a solid majority...what will the Blue Dogs do now? It would only take one or two of them to swing the Republican's way to get things the House puts forward through Congress. Conversely, if they stick with Obama, then they can put forward Obama's legislation and force the House to deal with it. I don't have a good feel for which way it will go--not sure they do either.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nighttimer
post Nov 4 2010, 05:16 AM
Post #18


*********
Advanced Senior Contributor

Sponsor
February 2007

Group: Sponsors
Posts: 4,660
Member No.: 504
Joined: February-16-03

Gender: Undisclosed
Politics: Undisclosed
Party affiliation: Undisclosed



QUOTE(Hobbes @ Nov 3 2010, 10:14 PM) *
I'm most curious to see what happens in the Senate. They struggled getting things passed with a solid majority...what will the Blue Dogs do now? It would only take one or two of them to swing the Republican's way to get things the House puts forward through Congress.


What will the Blue Dogs do?

Well, one thing they'll do is hold their meetings in a smaller room. Almost half of their members lost.

BLUE DOGS WHO LOST (22)
Mike Arcuri (NY)
Allen Boyd (FL)
Bobby Bright (AL)
Christopher Carney (PA)
Travis Childers (MS)
Kathy Dahlkemper (PA)
Lincoln Davis (TN)
Stephanie Herseth-Sandlin (SD)
Baron Hill (IN)
Frank Kratovil (MD)
Betsy Markey (CO)
Jim Marshall (GA)
Walt Minnick (ID)
Harry Mitchell (AZ)
Patrick Murphy (PA)
Scott Murphy (NY)
Glenn Nye (VA)
Earl Pomeroy (ND)
John Salazar (CO)
Zack Space (OH)
Gene Taylor (MS)
Charles Wilson (OH)

BLUE DOGS WHO STAYED (23)

Jason Altmire (PA)
Joe Baca (CA)
John Barrow (GA)
Dan Boren (OK)
Leonard Boswell (IA)
Dennis Cardoza (CA)
Ben Chandler (KY)
Jim Cooper (TN)
Henry Cuellar (TX)
Joe Donnelly (IN)
Jane Harman (CA)
Tim Holden (PA)
Mike McIntyre (NC)
Jim Matheson (UT)
Mike Michaud (ME)
Collin Peterson (MN)
Mike Ross (AR)
Loretta Sanchez (CA)
Adam Schiff (CA)
Kurt Schrader (OR)
David Scott (GA)
Heath Shuler (NC)
Mike Thompson (CA)

BLUE DOGS WHO RAN FOR HIGHER OFFICE (2)

Brad Ellsworth (IN) -- Lost Senate race
Charlie Melancon (LA) -- Lost Senate race

BLUE DOGS WHO RETIRED (4)

Marion Berry (AR)
Bart Gordon (TN)
Dennis Moore (KS)
John Tanner (TN)

BLUE DOGS IN RACES TOO CLOSE TO CALL (3)

Sanford Bishop (GA)
Jim Costa (CA)
Gabrielle Giffords (AZ)


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/11/03/b...s_n_778087.html

I'd throw Sen. Blanche Lincoln who lost her seat in Nebraska in with the other Blue Dog losers. Not that the night went well for progressives like Sen. Russ Feingold and Rep. Alan Grayson. But I'm not sorry to see a bunch of play-it-safe Democrats see their ranks cut in half. I'd much rather see real Republicans in power than phony Democrats. dry.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Christopher
post Nov 4 2010, 05:47 AM
Post #19


********
Millennium Mark

Group: Members
Posts: 1,352
Member No.: 1,696
Joined: November-9-03

From: Phoenix AZ
Gender: Male
Politics: Independent
Party affiliation: Private



I would like to take a moment and say to all American Veterans,

I'm Sorry.

I am glad we still have a very peaceful elections system that efficiently and peacefully allows for transistions of power and leadership, but I apologize humbly for the clowns we elect and the people who shame lemmings in electing them.

What does this mid term mean? Jack + Squat.

The GOP is already firing up the supoenas and Threatening to shut down the government............the part of Newt Gingrich will be played today by jim DeMint.........................."What's up Normie! The world is dog eat dog and I'm wearing Milk Bone underwear........

wounded Americans suffering through 2 more years of plague and pestilence and Jersey Shore took it out on the elected officials. In and of itself a good thing. A habit I hope will someday soon become a national pasttime where we all get together every 2 years and send these fools who spent millions for in comparison minimum wage jobs packing. We may not be able to vote none of the above but its a good second.

A few of the more rabid teabaggers will begin to look like doofuses with plans to shut down public schools by April and selling the Grand Canyon to allow for bungee jumping parks and private resorts. Attempts to imprison democrats will be made by certain GOPers anxious to make a name for themselves now that they have power. Talk Radio will actually get even more shrill and even though the GOP won big threats of secession will still be made if America doesn't just submit.

I'm hoping Ed Schultz makes the Dead pool this year. He is really awful.

I may not care for Obama but dang man, nut UP! Fight back, do something! I likes my politics full contact. Hilary would have already had Demint assasinated. I don't want anything the Democrats are selling but hell have they all sacrificed their testosterone? Get your balls out of your purses and start throwing punches or the GOP is gonna prison shower scene you.

I want my Gridlock to last awhile Dems. Its Fight Club time.

Lord help me but Rubio's speech was a good one. Careful Dems, The GOP has got themselves a Latino, that brings them up to .000168 non white participants (not serving drinks or cutting their lawns) before you know it they might change their standard issue hair helmet after more than a century of use.(sometimes conservative can be too conservative)
Can we start an informal poll on how long it takes for the GOPers to start viewing him as their Great Non White Hope. Sure he's Latino but he is clean cut and speaks with such great diction (sound familiar Liberals?)

Libertarians will still be irrelevant and yet still think that maybe just maybe...........................................

The reality of this mid term? You choose. Its either

"Second verse same as the first......................"

or for the geeks among us

"This has all happened before and it will happen again"
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
AuthorMusician
post Nov 4 2010, 08:52 AM
Post #20


**********
Glasses and journalism work for me.

Sponsor
November 2003

Group: Sponsors
Posts: 6,346
Member No.: 297
Joined: December-1-02

From: Blueberry Hill
Gender: Male
Politics: Liberal
Party affiliation: Democrat



QUOTE(Hobbes @ Nov 3 2010, 10:14 PM) *
So, given the history of mid-term elections, is this business as usual for a mid-term or a revolution the right wing predicted, or even a mandate?

Given the magnitude of the change, I don't think you can classify it as business as usual. However, given some of the Senate races swinging back to Democrats, I don't think you can call it a revolution, either. Exit polls were fairly consistent in describing concern about spending/deficit/direction as the reason for the votes that went the Republican's way, so I think you can say that it was a mandate, especially in the House--those votes could easily swing the other way if voters don't like how things are going in a couple of years.

What will come of all this? I suspect not alot. Attempts to curb spending/repeal Obamacare will generate press, but not much else. Obama will probably have to work with Republicans to get any of his agenda passed, which might not be a bad thing. I'm most curious to see what happens in the Senate. They struggled getting things passed with a solid majority...what will the Blue Dogs do now? It would only take one or two of them to swing the Republican's way to get things the House puts forward through Congress. Conversely, if they stick with Obama, then they can put forward Obama's legislation and force the House to deal with it. I don't have a good feel for which way it will go--not sure they do either.


No, there is still the filibuster. Republicans set the precedent, and now they will have to live with it. Nothing the House passes will get through the Senate without a 60-vote ultra super majority. The convincing has now gone to the R side, and they are way out of practice.

Too bad that the Rs decided not to change the Senate rules when they had a chance. Typically, they've shot themselves in the foot again. It's business as usual.

This could mean a tax hike for the middle class. Thanks Rs, we all needed that badly. We also know that the inability of the Rs to compromise has led us to this situation. On the positive side, the tax hike will help reduce the deficit. Now we will see if people actually wanted to do that or were bamboozled again, which is business as usual.

President Obama got so much through in the first two years, he may play it out as simply letting the House reveal itself over and over again. So then in 2012 it will be obvious that the electorate made a big mistake in 2010, and so the power swings left again. Happens all the time . . . business as usual.

Bennet (D) defeated Buck ® for that Colorado Senate seat. Buck was "too honest," according to his campaign. Yep, and so were the truly revolutionary radicals who ran for office and lost. I was wrong that the progressives would change business as usual, oh well. Now it's the tea party types who were wrong. No revolution but a worsening condition for the middle class and the Nouveau Pauvre.

Oh yes, and a government shutdown. Get ready all those who receive benefits but are either unaware of it or refuse to admit it. The Republicans are about to school you in the realities of economics (rich get richer, you get screwed).
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

3 Pages V   1 2 3 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 

  
Go to the top of the page - Simple Version Time is now: June 20th, 2018 - 04:55 PM
©2002-2010 America's Debate, Inc.  All rights reserved.