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> Equifax Data Breach, Time to regulate more strictly?
AuthorMusician
post Sep 23 2017, 02:10 PM
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Most people have at least heard of the Equifax data breach that let crooks take credit information and other personal data on 140+ million USA citizens, which pretty much covers the entire adult population. If not, just google it for all the stuff that's now known about the potentially disastrous event.

What should be done now that we know how credit-reporting outfits treat our sensitive information and respond to events like this?

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Mrs. Pigpen
post Sep 25 2017, 01:02 PM
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What should be done now that we know how credit-reporting outfits treat our sensitive information and respond to events like this?

Not sure. Due to the nature of my spouse's employment our data has been hacked more than once.
Last time it was an OPM (office of personnel management) data breach, which means it included a lot more relevant personal information about us and our family members than the Equinox hack (our parents naturalization numbers, SS numbers and so forth too).

But the government was generous and gave us (just immediate family, not our parents of course) a year's worth of "free credit protection"!!
So everything's square. [/sarcasm]

We are all one misconfigured router, one lost notebook, one badly designed webpage, one angry employee, one misplaced USB stick, one lazy IT worker, etc., away from being (expletive).
Some of us have expletived more than once.

This post has been edited by Mrs. Pigpen: Sep 25 2017, 01:03 PM
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Hobbes
post Sep 25 2017, 03:16 PM
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QUOTE(Mrs. Pigpen @ Sep 25 2017, 07:02 AM) *
But the government was generous and gave us (just immediate family, not our parents of course) a year's worth of "free credit protection"!!
So everything's square. [/sarcasm]


Sarcasm justified! I mean the credit protection is all well and good, but the potential damage still exists, and liabilities could easily be in the millions. How, for example, does credit protection stop all identity theft?

QUOTE
We are all one misconfigured router, one lost notebook, one badly designed webpage, one angry employee, one misplaced USB stick, one lazy IT worker, etc., away from being (expletive).
Some of us have expletived more than once.


Which shows what a sorry state security in this country is really in. It was reported on another site discussing this that the Equifax security VP was previously a music teacher, with NO SECURITY BACKGROUND???

if that is actually true, Equifax should probably be sued out of existence. Which is how the market deals with these things---you don't actually need more regulation. The government's track record on security sucks...why would we trust those idiots to come up with reasonable effective regulation? I saw the first HIPAA regulations, and the overriding thought as I read them was 'whoever wrote this is completely clueless about computers'. I don't think it would be any different here. UNLESS the regulation they wrote simply made it clear that companies holding personal information were infinitely liable for any data breaches in which said information was obtained. That would then spur said companies to take appropriate steps on their own, and treat it as seriously as it needs to be. Security, like DR, provides no direct benefit. It is really insurance...money spent to avoid something bad possibly happening later. As such, it is often neglected, or minimized. All too often, security is treated the same way as DR. As soon as something bad has already happened, companies take it seriously. But, then, of course, it's too late. The problem the Equifax breach, and others, point out, though, is it isn't their data at risk, but ours.

This post has been edited by Hobbes: Sep 25 2017, 03:18 PM
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AuthorMusician
post Sep 25 2017, 04:18 PM
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QUOTE(Mrs. Pigpen @ Sep 25 2017, 09:02 AM) *
What should be done now that we know how credit-reporting outfits treat our sensitive information and respond to events like this?

Not sure. Due to the nature of my spouse's employment our data has been hacked more than once.
Last time it was an OPM (office of personnel management) data breach, which means it included a lot more relevant personal information about us and our family members than the Equinox hack (our parents naturalization numbers, SS numbers and so forth too).

But the government was generous and gave us (just immediate family, not our parents of course) a year's worth of "free credit protection"!!
So everything's square. [/sarcasm]

We are all one misconfigured router, one lost notebook, one badly designed webpage, one angry employee, one misplaced USB stick, one lazy IT worker, etc., away from being (expletive).
Some of us have expletived more than once.

Yep, and the more you've got, the worse it could get.

At minimum, we need laws that force credit-reporting entities to freeze the data by default, allowing access only if the data owners (you and me) authorize it. Businesses have proven beyond a hint of doubt that they are not responsible enough to have free access to our data.

I'm not sure exactly how this could be handled, but I'm a big fan of multiple authorization techs, such as tokens along with passwords.

I'm also in favor of hardwired point-to-point networks over the TCP/IP scheme. Add automatic encryption in there, preferrably hardware-based.

Hopefully, the brightest minds in data security are working the problem. Realistically, it's being worked by business and political leaders. We are so explicated.

I'm expecting articles to come out that give advice on how to avoid credit ratings altogether. Maybe:

Ten Ways to Destroy Your Credit History

Bartering: The Safe Economy

Singing For Your Supper, Not Just For Buskers Anymore

How Sex For Money Became Obsolete

The Poorest People In Hollywood

And so forth.
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AuthorMusician
post Oct 3 2017, 03:27 AM
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Saw a report that Equifax knew about security problems way back in March. Around that time, one of my credit cards was used by someone in China. The bank called me up to check if I was actually trying to buy the stuff, so the crime was defeated by issuing a new CC and CC number.

On the upside, the crooks were probably detected and foiled in most cases. But that does nothing regarding the lack of trust in corporations handling our data. I suppose distrust will go away with time, assuming the holders of our data get their acts together.

Seems to be a foolish assumption. I see credit history freezing in my future. Also a dark handsome woman.
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