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> RFID Technology, Privacy concerns of implants
Billy Jean
post Jan 20 2006, 04:32 PM
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http://www.engadget.com/2006/01/12/new-zea...t-gps-receiver/

QUOTE
New Zealand's Rakon develops world's smallest GPS receiver

So you think today's handheld, SDIO and cellphone-based GPS units are small? Get ready for a new generation of even smaller GPS devices, ranging from wristwatches to slim cellphones to -- and we just know this is coming -- implants.


http://www.eetimes.com/showArticle.jhtml;j...cleID=177101437

QUOTE
Report: RFID production to increase 25 fold by 2010


With the vast increase and miniaturization of microchip technology and the soon to be launched Galileo GPS system by Europe http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galileo_positioning_system , what could the future hold for privacy rights? Yeah, the idea of having all your vital information at your finger tips does sound comforting, elimintating identity theft, but what could some of the down sides be of getting "chipped"?

Would you be in favor of "chipping" Americans to end such problems as kidnapping or runaways?

What are the potential abuses of RFID technology?

Do you think the government would abuse this technology and invade citizens' right to privacy?


This post has been edited by Amlord: Jan 20 2006, 08:23 PM
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Blackstone
post Mar 20 2006, 04:26 AM
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Again, the transmission distance is completely irrelevant. Just look at credit cards, which you mentioned. The "transmission distance" of those is all but zero, and yet it can be used to track activity. The relevant measure is not transmission distance, but number of times you'll be expected to use it over the course of your daily activities. And that number will be far higher with RFID chips, providing government (or whomever else) with far more detailed information about what you're up to.
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inventor
post Mar 20 2006, 06:34 AM
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Blackstone,
I assume you believe there are already abuses of electronic data gathered by those/these technologies? I do not see additional potential being significantly increased if RFID is being added.

By your example I do not see additional tracking or significant tracking than is already done with the previously outlined-stated method/uses. can you elaborate how and where the RFID electronic applications is going to be increased on a person who already uses credit cards or ATM cards cell phones. Also specifically how is this more detailed information, I am not understanding the details that you are inferring here.


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DaytonRocker
post Mar 20 2006, 06:08 PM
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QUOTE(Blackstone @ Mar 19 2006, 11:26 PM)
Again, the transmission distance is completely irrelevant.  Just look at credit cards, which you mentioned.  The "transmission distance" of those is all but zero, and yet it can be used to track activity.  The relevant measure is not transmission distance, but number of times you'll be expected to use it over the course of your daily activities.  And that number will be far higher with RFID chips, providing government (or whomever else) with far more detailed information about what you're up to.
*


Did you even read any of the preceding posts? No RFID device or magnetic stripe transmits on it's own. The mag stripe only contains data that can be read by specific hardware. RFID tags can only be energized by an antenna in very close proximity to it. When it is energized, it can be read. No device is out there "beeping" information to anyone who can read it. And even if it were (which it is not), there are a multitude of frequencies and encryptions that make it impossible to decipher.

Take off the tin foil for a few moments and read the technical details about this subject before injecting an opinion like yours above that is completely absurd. You have strong objections to a system you don't even understand.
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Blackstone
post Mar 21 2006, 04:59 AM
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QUOTE(inventor @ Mar 20 2006, 01:34 AM)
By your example I do not see additional tracking or significant tracking than is already done with the previously outlined-stated method/uses.    can you elaborate how and where the RFID electronic applications is going to be increased on a person who already uses credit cards or ATM cards cell phones.
*

The fact that people will be expected to swipe their RFID tags in order to even enter establishments, for "security" purposes. More transactions - even the one-or-two dollar kind down at the local convenience store - will be conducted via these things than via credit cards currently. That's what I mean by more details.

QUOTE(DaytonRocker)
Did you even read any of the preceding posts? No RFID device or magnetic stripe transmits on it's own.

Nowhere was I implying that these things transmitted on their own. If it's the term "transmission distance" that has you up in arms, take it up with inventor. He initiated the term here.

Of course, if you'd been reading the preceding posts, you'd know that.
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inventor
post Mar 24 2006, 06:32 AM
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Blackstone

I do believe you do not really understand the tech issues here. But that really is not critical. Your main point is on target as far as it is easier to track what you are doing, but everything you fear is already possible by using a cell phone and regular credit card. So do you use these two?

And yes it will force more and more people to be traceable. If they are forced into using the RFID technologies when they did not use a cell phone or credit card. By the fact that 250 million cell phones were sold worldwide last quarter and the fact that we now know our government does not need a search warrant to do what ever they want to their political enemies we do have a lot to worry about.

So your concern is properly placed. maybe a bit over the edge in my book but my book is not the only book out there.

This post has been edited by inventor: Mar 24 2006, 06:34 AM
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Christopher
post Mar 25 2006, 01:52 AM
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and as always Big Brother or the Corporate Watchers paranoia gets a good slap from reality.

big brother will never be a match for social malcontents.

RFID tags vulnerable to viruses, study says

Like anything else there is always a loophole one can exploit if one is patient.
This goes right along with some plans on the net that use the flash in disposable cameras to deactivate the security tags in and on products designed to set off the door buzzers.

Always gonna be a fugg ugly in the soup.

Black hats always win thumbsup.gif



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Blackstone
post Mar 25 2006, 03:47 AM
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QUOTE(inventor @ Mar 24 2006, 01:32 AM)
And yes it will force more and more people to be traceable.  If they are forced into using the RFID technologies when they did not use a cell phone or credit card.  By the fact that 250 million cell phones were sold worldwide last quarter and the fact that we now know our government does not need a search warrant to do what ever they want to their political enemies we do have a lot to worry about.
*

It's not just the increase in the number of people that's the problem, but the increase in the number of situations in which those people will be expected to swipe in. And it's a vulnerability not just to government, but to anyone who might have access (legitimately or illegitmately) to that information.
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inventor
post Mar 25 2006, 03:20 PM
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Here is a recent application of RFID technology. This is an example that I think is well worth the expanding applications. And again they can determine where you started and ended up. No different than renting skis or anything else that you must use a credit card for rental like car rental. But I see this application another positive that may not have worded with credit cards but works with RFID.

http://www.itnews.com.au/print.aspx?CIID=26014&SIID=35

QUOTE
Cyclists can rent bicycles with a swipe of a contactless, pre-paid, RFID card at kiosks in Lyon, France.

JCDecaux said Monday it will add 100 Cyclocity self-checkout kiosks for the city of Lyon, France and the surrounding suburbs where cyclists can rent bicycles with a swipe of a contactless, pre-paid card with radio frequency identification technology (RFID) inside.


This post has been edited by inventor: Mar 25 2006, 03:57 PM
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inventor
post Mar 31 2006, 06:35 PM
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coming to a stove top near you... This one is great, here is a RFID cooking pan. I guess for those of us who can or can not cook? It adjusts the heat to the recipe. But for those who are paranoid about big brother ease dropping, it appears big brother could now know what's cooking in your kitchen. Maybe the insurance companies will increase your insurance for cutting to much cheese? Whats next the RFID food scale? time to weigh in!

Popsci

This post has been edited by inventor: Mar 31 2006, 06:37 PM
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