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> Do you intend to vote?, The Mid-term Elections are coming
Do you intend to vote?
You cannot see the results of the poll until you have voted. Please login and cast your vote to see the results of this poll.
Total Votes: 27
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Curmudgeon
post Oct 10 2010, 07:34 PM
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In High School Civics, we used to hear of graveyard voters, "Vote early and Often," and other practices of the past. I once heard it reported that the City of Chicago was incorporated as a city with more votes cast to do that; than the Census Bureau found people living in the Chicago area in the Census taken before and the Census taken after the election.

Looking at a random statistical analysis of voter turnout, it would appear that a 37% turnout for the mid-term elections would be about the best we should expect. That means that 19% of registered voters could theoretically constitute a "majority" at the polls on Election Day. With less than a 40% turnout, we essentially have a "1 voter = 2-1/2 votes" ratio instead of "1 man, 1 vote."

The Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission decision means that more money than ever is going in to advertising, PACS, "influencing the voters," etc. The media reports routinely how much it costs to win an election in today's world...and sends the politicians their bills for the advertising.

The TEA Party wants to "take our government back," but will they show up at the polls?

It's an old argument, "One vote doesn't count." vs. "We have the best government money can buy."

Choose a topic for Discussion:
Why I feel it is important that I vote.
Why I don't feel it is important that I vote.

This post has been edited by Curmudgeon: Oct 10 2010, 07:35 PM
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Belshazzar
post Oct 15 2010, 02:25 AM
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QUOTE(Curmudgeon @ Oct 10 2010, 03:34 PM) *
Why I feel it is important that I vote.


I could say civic duty, etc. But I always vote third party and I do get a strange satisfaction out of hearing "You're the reason [Democrat/Republican] lost the election!" mrsparkle.gif
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nighttimer
post Oct 15 2010, 10:11 AM
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I vote because not to disrespects and dishonors everyone that fought, bled and died to give me the right to vote. For far too long in this country Black people were systematically disenfranchised and not allowed to participate in this supposed democracy. To stay home only empowers those forces that would like to turn the clock back to that dark time.

Voting is more than a civic duty to me. It's a solemn responsibilty and one I take very seriously.

Besides, I like voting knowing doing so royally ticks off people who seriously hope I don't. mrsparkle.gif
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lederuvdapac
post Oct 15 2010, 01:40 PM
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Why I don't feel it is important that I vote.

I will not vote. Part of it is because I live in DC but am registered in NY. The main reason is because my vote doesn't really matter. There aren't really any candidates on the ballot that I think would do a good job and even if there was one *I* thought would do a decent job, they would lose by thousands of votes. So there is no practical reason for me to vote other than the appeal to "civic duty," which I do not find very convincing.

Politics are a commons. Nobody is responsible for their vote. Nobody is accountable for their actions. The value of an individual vote is negligible, therefore people remain rationally ignorant of the major issues and vote with what makes them feel good.

If there was a candidate that I favored, I would probably put in the effort for solidarity reasons more than anything. But I would not fall sway under the illusion that my vote mattered.

This post has been edited by lederuvdapac: Oct 15 2010, 03:07 PM
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AuthorMusician
post Oct 15 2010, 02:13 PM
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Got my mail-in ballot yesterday. I'll be taking a break from working with a new tech client this afternoon and voting in my home office. Then it's off to do errands and drop the ballot off at the post office.

Sure beats waiting in line and fits nicely into my schedule.
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Curmudgeon
post Oct 29 2010, 01:37 AM
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In a midterm election with an expected 35 39% turnout, 20% of registered voters represent a majority. If we wish to preserve our democracy, every vote counts. If you are registered, please take the time to vote!

The AARP has a very effective GOTV campaign going. If I ask for a senior discount, I get reminded to vote!

I used to get this sort of links from the labor unions when I was employed. The following came from an e-mail from The Coffee Party encouraging members to GET OUT THE VOTE!

QUOTE
To promote voting sanely, here are some great resources to share with everyone you know:

1.
Polling Place locator (New tool by Google)

2. Vote Smart (Amazing tool for getting information and matching you with the best candidate)

3. Local Voter Guides (Find one for your town or create your own)

4. Election Hotline (Ask questions and report problems)

5. Politifact (Check to see which campaign ads are true or false)


This post has been edited by Curmudgeon: Oct 29 2010, 01:38 AM
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Raptavio
post Oct 29 2010, 01:51 AM
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Why I feel it is important that I vote.

The future belongs to those who show up.

I became eligible to vote in 1989 and cast my first votes for the mayor and city council of St. Paul MN. (I voted for Jim Schiebel, who won and served until 1993, when he did not seek reelection and was replaced by Norm Coleman, and Paula Maccabee for City Council, who was running for reelection, won, and served one more term.) I've voted ever since.

The candidates for whom I voted have won, have lost, and have won and lost in real squeakers with recount battles (Franken, Gore). These things have taught me that every vote counts.

Not only am I voting, but I am participating in GOTV efforts, phone banking for my state Rep this weekend.

There are some out there who want to reject our electoral system, who make noises about choosing the bullet box when they can't win at the ballot box. Sharron Angle has alluded to it, Glenn Beck has alluded to it to the point where he's sponsored by those capitalizing on those who want to prepare for it, a Congressional candidate in Texas has overtly stated it, and festering little pools of the Internet plan for it.

Anyone who would reject democracy when their side loses is no American, I say. Win or lose, fair and free elections are the best means of preserving our democracy. And more power to it.
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