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> What are you currently reading?, What A.D.ers are reading as of late
nebraska29
post Oct 25 2005, 08:51 PM
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I'm currently devouring Robert B. Parker's book: Melancholy Baby, a good p.i. story. ph34r.gif

So what are you reading?


Note: We had this same topic open here: Great Books I've Been Reading but it had become large and a bit outdated. Please share your book recommendations here. smile.gif


This post has been edited by Jaime: Oct 25 2005, 09:14 PM
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kmsouthern
post Oct 25 2005, 09:04 PM
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Recently finished Michael Connelly's latest work, The Lincoln Lawyer, which is his first novel from the other side of the aisle of the law (a defense attorney). His previous works have been about detectives/cops/feds, but he did a marvelous job jumping into the 'dark side'. I happen to prefer the defense side of the aisle myself, so I'd love it if Connelly made a series out of this new character.

I'm currently (finally) reading Wicked. I've had my eyes set on this book for about a year now and finally got myself a copy from my local library. It is very good so far (only about 30 pages in).

I have about a zillion books checked out from the library right now. I do have to finish up David Sedaris' Dress Your Family... as I've read both Naked and Me Talk Pretty... (my library doesn't carry Barrel Fever) and absolutely LOVED them. I have a few books by other crime/mystery writers (Crais, Hiaasen, Evanovich) as well as some classics I'd like to read (Hemingway, Hawthorne). My library allows you to renew 5 times, with 3 week long checkouts...so I have a 3.5 months to finish my slew of books before I have to return them.
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Lesly
post Oct 25 2005, 09:09 PM
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I've been waiting for George RR Martin's next installment in A Song of Ice and Fire series. He's produced the best fiction I've read. Better than Tokein.

In the meantime I'm stuck with Kristen Britain's Green Rider: Book 2, First Rider's Call until I stop being a lazy and order Eric Hoffer's The True Believer and The Ordeal of Change.
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carlitoswhey
post Oct 25 2005, 09:36 PM
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The Flanders Panel, by Arturo Perez-Reverte currently has me sucked in. It's a pretty fast read, so I'm sort of pacing myself a few chapters every few days. I loved "Queen of the South" and am going back to his older stuff.

On the non-fiction front, The Progress Paradox : How Life Gets Better While People Feel Worse is very interesting. Reminds me of many debates here at AD - is the glass half full or half empty. biggrin.gif
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La Herring Rouge
post Oct 25 2005, 09:44 PM
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I've been reading Sailor song by Ken Kesey. His book Sometimes A Great notion is my favorite book ever and so I felt obliged to pick this one up. He did, of course, write One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest...a very gritty writer.

In reality I have been reading more young adult literature than anything...it's a hazard of the job. If anyone is interested in ideas for YAL books for themselves or their children give me a PM. It is a rather respectable genre now....some of it borders on canonical!
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blingice
post Oct 25 2005, 09:45 PM
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Dreamcatcher by Stephan King
and
Triss by Brian Jaques
and just ended
The Odyssey by Homer, Robert Fagles translation

Awesome books.
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quarkhead
post Oct 25 2005, 09:56 PM
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I've recently finished a few books.

Choke, by Chuck Palahniuk
Palahniuk is a very good writer, but you have to be prepared to enter his twisted worlds. This book is no exception. The title comes from the protagonist's unique scam to get money - he pretends to choke in restaurants, and takes advantage of the pity of the rescuing diners to get money from them. This guy also goes to sex addicts anonymous meetings to find sex partners. The book is full of Palahniuk's usual perversions and bizzare characters, but I found it enjoyable.

100 People Who Are Screwing Up America (And Al Franken Is #37) by Bernard Goldberg
After Bias, which was full of innacuracies, I was wary about this book. For the most part, however, he is fairly close to the mark. The problem with his list is that a lot of the people on it are on it for just being liberal, which isn't very convincing. Indeed, many of the liberals are cited for activities that are echoed (often even louder) on the right. That he can put Franken and Moore on the list, but leave off Coulter and O'Reilly is pretty sad. To his credit, he does include Michael Savage, and a few token Republicans, along with a few CEOs like Ken Lay. The cheapest shot in the book is that the number one position goes to Michael Moore, but there's not even any explanation - just a picture. As if it goes without saying that Moore is 'screwing up America.' His entry on Noam Chomsky is highly innacurate, and characterizes him as an "America hater," one of his more common, unsupported by fact, accusations. And where was Horowitz? God, that man needs to be in the top ten! Overall, though, this book isn't bad. I have read quite a few conservative polemic works, and I would rank this well above Coulter's Treason, Hannity's Let Freedom Ring (which is completely idiotic), or O'Reilly's Who's Looking Out For You?. I can't even put the Michael Savage book I read into the same sentence with those others - and Hannity and Coulter are pretty horrible as it is!

The Dark Tower by Steven King
I first read these as they came out, but recently went back and read them all in succession. Definitely King's masterwork. I loved the worlds he created here. Inserting himself into the story could have been a huge mistake, but King handled it very well, it was quite intriguing. I loved how this story brings together so many themes (and even characters) from his other work. Indeed, reading this series will give you a whole new level of insight into King's literary universe. Very, very well done.

The Republican Noise Machine by David Brock
Brock was originally a shill for the conservative movement. His first well-known book was The Real Anita Hill. After an epiphany of integrity, he switched gears and wrote Blinded by the Right : The Conscience of an Ex-Conservative,, detailing how he played a part in not only the destruction of Hill, but the larger attack on the Clintons. In this newer book, he exhaustively details the movement of the mass media toward the right. Very enlightening and full of verifiable references. I'd recommend this book to anyone interested in media and bias.

Chain of Command : The Road from 9/11 to Abu Ghraib by Seymour M. Hersh
Wow. Everyone should read this book. From the reporter who first broke the story about Abu Ghraib. Very detailed. Very scary.

Propaganda and the Public Mind by Noam Chomsky
An enlightening series of interviews. Business Week says it best: "Reading Chomsky is like standing in a wind tunnel. With relentless logic, Chomsky bids us to listen closely to what our leaders tell us--and to discern what they are leaving out...The questions Chomsky raises will eventually have to be answered. Agree with him or not, we lose out by not listening."

I've read a bunch more... but I'll leave you all with these, for now.
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Cyan
post Oct 25 2005, 10:11 PM
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I just finished reading The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers, a brilliant southern writer who focused on characters who are isolated in one way or another.

I'm also reading To Charles Fort, with Love by Caitlin R. Kiernan, The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories by H.P. Lovecraft, and The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury. These are all fantastic collections of short fiction.

Edited to fix my BB Code. blush.gif

This post has been edited by Cyan: Oct 25 2005, 10:12 PM
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Ultimatejoe
post Oct 25 2005, 11:15 PM
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This is normally the time of year where I pick up my illustrated copy of the Silmarilion and dive back in. Unfortunately I loaned it out before the summer and I'm not sure when I'll get it back. So instead I'm going to grab a copy of Beowulf and try and figure it out. Not for any scholarly interest or anything... just so I can see what all the fuss is about.
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Dontreadonme
post Oct 26 2005, 12:04 AM
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I'm currently reading The Devil's Disciples, by Anthony Read. It details the early years and rise of the Nazi Party in Germany, how the influences on WWI/Versailles/Great Depression factored into their popularity, and chronicles the relationships of Goring, Goebbels and Himmler.

It's not exactly spellbinding, but for anyone interested in WWII/ETO history and political science, it's pretty interesting. I'm fascinated with the political marriages of socialism and fascism with industrialists and aristocracy that took place in the Weimar years.

On the fiction side I just finished To The Last Man, by Jeff Shaara. The book tells the story of both key players and common soldiers during WWI. I recommend this to anyone who enjoyed his previous work.
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turnea
post Oct 26 2005, 12:44 AM
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QUOTE(blingince)
Dreamcatcher by Stephan King
and
Triss by Brian Jaques
and just ended
The Odyssey by Homer, Robert Fagles translation

Awesome books.

It's good to know I'm not the only one who still reads Redwall. On that particular note I plan never to grow up.

Current reading is a little more substantial.

I finished reading The Two Koreas by Don Oberdorfer...

the last of the holdovers from the summer reading list and an excellent, readable book on the up and downs of US -Korea relations, it puts vital perspective on current events in the region.

I'm now into Wars of Imperial Conquest in Africa by Bruce Vandervort mostly a military history of the "Scramble for Africa".

I'm just about into the Anglo-Zulu War, very interesting and accessible so far.
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Amlord
post Oct 26 2005, 01:52 AM
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QUOTE(Lesly @ Oct 25 2005, 05:09 PM)
I've been waiting for George RR Martin's next installment in A Song of Ice and Fire series. He's produced the best fiction I've read. Better than Tokein.


Same here Lesly. I am also eagerly awaiting "A Feast for Crows" which is only about a year and half overdue... sad.gif

QUOTE(quarkhead)
The Dark Tower by Steven King
I first read these as they came out, but recently went back and read them all in succession. Definitely King's masterwork. I loved the worlds he created here. Inserting himself into the story could have been a huge mistake, but King handled it very well, it was quite intriguing. I loved how this story brings together so many themes (and even characters) from his other work. Indeed, reading this series will give you a whole new level of insight into King's literary universe. Very, very well done.


The Dark Tower is a great series. I have read up to The Dark Tower IV -- Wizard and Glass which I read when I was in Italy many moons ago. I have not read the most recent books, which took years to come out. I must pick up these books (and the first four, which I no longer have...)

I am currently reading Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States 1492-Present, which was provided to me by Cyan. Thanks Cyan!!

I love history books and fiction, in general. I very rarely read political books (although I recently re-read The Prince and the Discourses by Machiavelli devil.gif )

I also recently read a fascinating history of the Maya.

I don't read nearly as much as I used to. Bad behavior is so habit-forming, unfortunately... sad.gif
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Devils Advocate
post Oct 26 2005, 04:31 AM
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East of Eden - John Steinbeck

Second Treatise of Government - John Lock

Liberty - John Mill (apparently I'm all about the John's)

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass - Douglass



The first is for pleasure, the last three are for class, but I have enjoyed them. Steinbeck is excellent and I enjoy (more or less) all his books. Though I think this one is better to me than some of the others I've read.

I would recommend everyone who has eyes read Douglass' autobiography. First off it's short (too short I thought) and it's very well written. It demonstrates quite concisely the horrors of slavery and the keys to breaking it. I would say this is a must read for every student at one point in their education.

Recently (ie. over the summer):

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas - Hunter S. Thompson (excellent and entertaining)

Something Wicked This Way Comes - Ray Bradbury (excellent and very well written, reminded me of Tolkien's writing style)

Slaughter-house Five - Kurt Vonnegut (I thoroughly disliked this book and got through it by sheer will alone, maybe I didn't "get" it, but I didn't enjoy it)

2001: A Space Odyssey - Arthur C. Clarke (Loved it, Clarke is a great writer)

2010: Odyssey Two - Clarke (Not as good as 2001, but worth reading)

Diary - Chuck Palahniuk (Great, pessimistic, and negative. Just what I look for when I read Palahniuk though I liked Survivor and Fight Club more)

Invisable Monsters - Palahniuk (Also great and negative, not his best to me though)

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BoF
post Oct 26 2005, 05:13 AM
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QUOTE(Devils Advocate @ Oct 25 2005, 11:31 PM)
East of Eden - John Steinbeck

The first is for pleasure, the last three are for class, but I have enjoyed them.  Steinbeck is excellent and I enjoy (more or less) all his books.  Though I think this one is better to me than some of the others I've read.


I read quite a bit of Steinbeck when I was in my 20s. I think his three best and perhaps most important are: The Grapes of Wrath (One could make a case for it bbeing the American novel), East of Eden and one of his last, The Winter of Our Discontent.

Good choice. smile.gif

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nighttimer
post Oct 26 2005, 03:10 PM
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I've got a loooong list of books I want to read and I'm currently enjoying Reefer Madness: Sex, Drugs, and Cheap Labor in the American Black Market by Eric Schlosser, author of Fast Food Nation.

It's quite startling to realize that the underground economy of the nation means billions of dollars change hands. It definitely convinced me that marijuana should be decriminalized.

A fascinating, well-written and researched effort by Mr. Schlosser. thumbsup.gif
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psyclist
post Oct 26 2005, 03:17 PM
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I am reading The Science of God: The Convergence of Scientific and Biblical Wisdom by Gerald Schroeder. Interestingly enough, I've come to realized that Kabalists (the old school ones probably not the Hollywood ones) have some of the same beliefs that I do. Go figure.

I'm also reading Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong by James W. Loewen.

I also have O'Reilly's Programming C# (not by choice), Perl Cookbook, and various XMLesq and PHP books that I'm referencing on and off as my day goes on.
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TedN5
post Oct 26 2005, 04:54 PM
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Didn't we do this once before? In that other thread I posted many of the books I had read over the previous 14 months. See Reading List. I'm afraid my book reading remains focussed on the American and world existential crisis. Some of the books I have read since posting the above list include:

Twilight in the Desert: The Coming Saudi Oil Shock and the World Economy by Matthew Simmons, an analysis of technical papers presented by Aramco to the Society of Petroleum Engineers which provides a second avenue of evidence for an imminent peak in world oil production

Steal this Vote by Andrew Gumbel, an detailed look at vote fraud throughout American history including 2000 and 2004.

The Culture of Make Believe by Derrick Jensen, a disturbing book that really tries to get inside the skin of abusers and committers of atrocities

War Is a Force that Gives Us Meaning by Chris Hedges, a former war correspondent, that tries to understand what attracts soldiers, correspondents, and the general public to war

Losing Moses on the Freeway also by Chris Hedges, which is more of a religious book that tries to interpret that 10 commandments in a way that makes them a real shield for living and not a list of dos and don'ts

Chain of Command: The Road from 9/11 to Abu Ghraib by Seymour Hersh, an account of the War on Terror through 2004 from the perspective of America's preeminent investigative reporter. I had previously read all of Hersh's New Yorker articles and a portion of this book so much of the material was familiar. However, I found myself putting together a number of things I had overlooked before reading this book carefully.

I am currently reading Torture and Truth: America, Abu Ghraib and the War on Terror by Mark Danner which is an account with the key documentation of the torture and mistreatment of WOT prisoners and the failure of the American democracy to find an appropriate response.

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Roswell
post Oct 26 2005, 06:25 PM
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The Bourne Trilogy (Identity, Supremecy, Ultimatium) by Robert Ludlum

Not my usual cup of tea, but very interesting. I normally stick to history and fantasy novels.
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AuthorMusician
post Oct 26 2005, 07:00 PM
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Monster by Walter Dean Myers. I've got a paying gig to write a summary/analysis on this award-winning novel. Sweet deal, eh? It's an ongoing thing too, so I get to read and learn how others write, and make a few bucks doing it.

This story is an easy read, which means it's a bitch to analyze. Myers packs a lot of meaning into a few words. The plot is simple: 16-year-old black kid is up for murder. The story covers his prison and courtroom experiences, plus flashbacks to incidents that happened before the murder, all from the kid's point of view. Myers uses an interesting blend of narrative and screenplay for the book's structure.

I'm on my third reading. It's a work that needs serious digestion and would be a good choice for a reading club, where folks get together and discuss something that everyone has read. I'm sure it's in many literature classrooms. Myers wrote this one for young readers, so it ought to be in early high school studies. The American justice system can grab your butt before you know it, and that's going to change your life no matter what the verdict.

Scary stuff, especially when you consider the high percentage of our population that is in prison or has been. Don't think it can happen to you? Well, be careful out there.
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Vibiana
post Oct 26 2005, 07:05 PM
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Just finished Bill Maher's latest, "New Rules: Polite Musings from a Timid Observer," and found it hilarious and thought-provoking.

Just picked up "Surrounded by Idiots: Fighting Liberal Lunacy in America" by Mike Gallagher at the library, but haven't started it yet. I love poli sci and sociology books, read every one I can find from every possible viewpoint. I don't agree with a lot of them, but it gives me a window on other people's perceptions.

I also picked up a hilarious one called "The Jerk With the Cell Phone: A Survival Guide for the Rest of Us" by Barbara Pachter. I want to make sure I don't act like a jerk! LOL
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