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> China on the Moon by 2017?, Realistic goal? Implications?
Victoria Silverw...
post Nov 5 2005, 08:24 AM
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China seems to be pushing its space program assertively:

Link

QUOTE
China, which launched its first manned space mission just two years ago, plans to put a man on the moon around 2017 and investigate what may be the perfect source of fuel, a newspaper reported on Friday.


To be debated:

1. Is this a realistic goal for China?

2. If this is a success, what are the implications for the world? (In particular, how will this effect the space programs of other nations, or international programs? And is lunar helium-3 really an important potential resource?)


This post has been edited by Victoria Silverwolf: Nov 5 2005, 08:25 AM
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Christopher
post Nov 5 2005, 02:18 PM
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1. Is this a realistic goal for China?

2. If this is a success, what are the implications for the world? (In particular, how will this effect the space programs of other nations, or international programs? And is lunar helium-3 really an important potential resource?)



Imagine this---You want to be a Super Power. Prestige is gained in this world by your deeds and accomplishments. You reach the moon--the world is watching the event on their newchannels--your astronauts exit the vehichle and make those first steps on the lunar landscape. They walk over to where the American flag stands planted--remove it and casually toss it aside..........Replacing it with their own
With as many people out there who dislike us I imagine the laughter would be quite loud.


As for the Helium 3---its "potential" is very interesting. However as the link to the wikipedia will quickly explain it ain't quite there yet----just like sources like solar and hydrogen.

It could be---but the technology isnt at the needed level yet.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helium-3

This post has been edited by christopher: Nov 5 2005, 02:19 PM
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Rancid Uncle
post Nov 5 2005, 03:09 PM
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1. Is this a realistic goal for China?
Potentially but I don't see why they'd want to. Computer technology will have improved more than a smidgen between 1972 and 2017. It seems like robots would be cheaper, and better, at digging up moon rocks and whatever else they do up there. There is the prestige factor of a manned mission but they're about 48 years late.

2. If this is a success, what are the implications for the world? (In particular, how will this effect the space programs of other nations, or international programs? And is lunar helium-3 really an important potential resource?)
I think it will show that China is becoming a stronger, more industrialized country, capable of wasting billions of dollars to prove its machismo. As time goes on I think more and more countries will be capable of having a space program. That's probably a good thing except for the fact that this also means more and more countries will have ICBM's. I think lunar helium-3 is great if you want to spend 5 billion dollars per mega watt hour. Otherwise you might want try something more cost effective like burning Van Gogh paintings for firewood.
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CruisingRam
post Nov 6 2005, 05:05 AM
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1)Is this a realistic goal for China?-

Yes, and a very healthy one IMHO- I think that engaging in some space colonization is pretty healthy for thier culture and economy. I have a feeling the Chinese are holding to the political stereotype of looking at things in a large time frame.

The entire moon landing shoved our own tech forward with a vengence, and will probably have the same effect on thier culture and economy as it had on ours.

Also, there is alot of money in the space program in spin offs as it turns out. Like regular sattelite launches. Russia is the "bread and butter" favorite on this one right now.

Also, every country with a space program ought to be looking towards colonization of our nearest planets. Who knows what discoveries this will bring- and the society that doesn't strive to keep up in this area will probably see alot of it's influence fade away. I would bet money that this entire venture is in the hopes of starting a commercial space industry. I also think they DO have natural resources in mind as well- getting a colony on the moon of what is, in reality, a really big space station with a smaller gravity well than earth- a natural for a "shipping harbour" of you will hmmm.gif - China is feeling the pinch of future peak oil, scarcity of resources to get the stuff they need for thier huge new manufacturing economy base. What would happen to the stability of china if the main underpinnings of thier new economy, manufacturing, were to have to shut down for lack of resources to run them? hmmm.gif

2. If this is a success, what are the implications for the world? (In particular, how will this effect the space programs of other nations, or international programs? And is lunar helium-3 really an important potential resource?)

Like I said above- a nation that really falls behind in this, especially the western nations, will probably be in big trouble in a couple decades!

Who knows- Chinese physicists and engineers are no better or worse than the western nations and Russia - so perhaps the chinese are taking a big gamble to be the next Saudi Arabia?
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