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psyclist
The trail for Saddam was once again delayed today after the defendants complain about court-appointed attorneys.

We've seen a myriad of problems with the run up to the trail including kidnapping and murder of the defense counsel, boycotts, and lawyers not able to meet with their clients. So I wondered... hmmm.gif


Can Saddam get a fair trial?

How important is it that Saddam get a fair trial for the American public? For the Iraqis? For the world?

What outcome do you expect from the trail?

In your opinion, what do you think that the outcome should be?

What ramifications or precedent do you see being set by this trail?



edited to remove a question that probably warrents its own thread.
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VDemosthenes
QUOTE(psyclist @ Nov 28 2005, 03:53 PM)
Can Saddam get a fair trial?

How important is it that Saddam get a fair trial for the American public?  For the Iraqis?  For the world?

What outcome do you expect from the trail?

In your opinion, what do you think that the outcome should be?

What ramifications or precedent do you see being set by this trail?

*



1.) Too much is working against him. Whether his attorneys like it or not, the evidence is far too overwhelming for any sensible tribunal to grant him a pardon of any form.

2.) You see, that is the problem. When people lead very public lives they can never expect to be able to deny anything. As far as the world, the American citizens watching and the Iraqis hoping for justice, the man is guilty as homemade sin. His actions were known to all. And they were highly and very well documented-- what hope for a fair trial can there be?

3.) Guilty verdict and public execution by hanging from the neck until death.

4.) Guilty verdict and public execution by hanging from the neck until death.

5.) Well, a precedent will not be set. There is not another Iraq and there is not another Saddam Hussein-- so obviously there is little concern over that. Ramifications? His supporters may finally come to grips that he will not be returning to power.




Julian
Can Saddam get a fair trial?

By Western standards, no, he probably cannot.

But by Iraqi standards in recent times, the fact that he's getting a trial at all is a huge advance from the days when he was in power.

It will be a bit of a drawn-out affair, and a bit muddled, and he'll never recognise the legitimacy of the court or any sentence it hands down, so his supporters will be able to turn him into a martyr after he's gone (he's an old man now, so even life without parole is unlikely to last more than 10 or 15 years).

In a way, it's an encouraging sign that the trial has been postponed (again) while they look for more defence lawyers to replace the ones recently murdered. This is no kangaroo court, or at least, they are determined to dot every 'i' and cross every 't' on the death warrant.

How important is it that Saddam get a fair trial for the American public? For the Iraqis? For the world?

I'm tempted to say that the American public are entirely irrelevant, since none of the crimes he's been charged with (or so much as hinted at with any justification) have affected the American public in any way. At best, they are interested onlookers with a reason to hope for a guilty verdict, but so are most of the rest of the world.

For the world at large (into which category I'd place the Americans as no more & no less important than anyone else) this is a reinforcement of the message that tyrrany is not approved of, (even if it is sometimes tolerated when politically expedient).

For Iraq, this must be a most cathartic experience, drawing a line between past and future. Whether events before the line will be looked back on with nostalgia or distaste remains to be seen. In time, a peace and reconciliation commission, like the one used in South Africa, which is more interested in uncovering truth than dishing out punishment, might be a very useful process for Iraq as a nation (if it stays united). I think it will certainly help people understand how to avoid such situations again more than show trials can.

What outcome do you expect from the trail?
Guilty as charged. I'm not sure what the sentence will be. I have no objection to the death penalty in principle in this case, since Saddam's gassing of Kurds and murdering political opponents is a matter of public record, even in Iraq. there's no chance of him later being found innocent. However, I think the court should feel able to commute a death sentence to life without parole if they judge that his value to any remaining Ba'athist insurgents as a martyr is greater dead than in an isolation cell with little or no outside (and absolutely no media) contact.

In your opinion, what do you think that the outcome should be?
Guilty as charged, and probably life without parole in an isolation cell with absolutely no unmediated outside contact, only because I fear his elevation to matyrdom by some opponents of Iraqi democracy.

What ramifications or precedent do you see being set by this trail?
The trial is following precedent (in particular Nuremburg), even if following it inexactly, not setting them.
Sleeper
QUOTE(Julian)
But by Iraqi standards in recent times, the fact that he's getting a trial at all is a huge advance from the days when he was in power.



You should post that in a thread about whether things are getting better or worse in Iraq since the removal of Saddam thumbsup.gif

Can Saddam get a fair trial?

Hmmmm. Does he deserve one? I am sure he afforded many Iraqi's a free trial when he was in power didn't he? wacko.gif Like some others have said, when your dealings are in this much spotlight and everyone knows you are guilty it is almost impossible to get a fair trial.



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