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Jaken
I was reading in a past issue of Popular Science and they had an article about diametric levataion. Back in the day a man named Earshaw stated

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Earnshaw's theorem from 1842 states that the stable levitation of a permanent magnet is impossible without an added force for stabilization. This can be demonstrated with a stack of ring magnets--unless they have a stick through the center, they will flip over instead of levitating. However, the phenomenon of diamagnetism can provide the stabilizing force needed for levitation without any sort of stick or tether


Well reading the article further explained that graphite is perfect for diametric levitation, and has been used to float a hamster!

Though some diametric levataion requires the use of liquid nitrogen. In a video i downloaded it show a magnet in a ceramic bowl filled with liquid nitrogen. Then a graphite cube is placed over the bowl and it floats. It will continue to float until the nitrogen either is removed or warms up.

Here are some site i found, look up some more.

http://www.otherpower.com/newmaglev.html
http://home.earthlink.net/~lenyr/levmag.htm

So finally to my question. Do you think that Diametric Levitation could be used to benefit man kind, or is it isolated to floating hamsters.
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Victoria Silverwolf
I see no reason why this could not become useful in the future, although it's just a very cool toy right now. Diamagnetism can be used to produce levitation without the need for superconductors. It seems probable that this could be made affordable for uses such as "floating" trains. The advantage of such a system is the great reduction in friction between the vehicle and the rails, which would increase speed and reduce energy costs. As a matter of fact, this seems to be going on right now:

Chinese Love Levitating Train
nikachu
A friend of mine did a PhD in diamagnetism. He also floated a frog.

Victoria Silverwolf i was under the impression that a useful diamagnetic effect could only be achieved with super conductors and that the challenge was to design superconducting material at higher temperatures. I have not heard of it being achieved otherwise - do you have a link at all..? (Not arguing, just curious)

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Victoria Silverwolf
QUOTE(nikachu @ Apr 8 2004, 11:51 AM)


Victoria Silverwolf i was under the impression that a useful diamagnetic effect could only be achieved with super conductors and that the challenge was to design superconducting material at higher temperatures. I have not heard of it being achieved otherwise - do you have a link at all..? (Not arguing, just curious)

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Here's a link:

Diamagnetically stabilized magnet levitation

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A very stable permanent magnet levitator that works at room temperature without superconductors and without energy input is possible with a combination of magnetic attraction and diamagnetic repulsion. This was reported by Geim et al. in Nature (Vol. 400, 22 July 1999, p.323).


I don't know if this will ever be "useful" or not, or just an interesting effect, but I see no reason why it would be impossible to someday make a large version of this small device.
QuantumMekanic
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So finally to my question. Do you think that Diametric Levitation could be used to benefit man kind, or is it isolated to floating hamsters.


It is probably only useful to floating hamsters, it requires the a magnet placed on the hamster itself somehow. moreover it requires diametric plates and doesn't seem to be able to be applied at long distances. Spinning a magnet or a metal plate on an axis also has a stabilizing effect on a magnetizable object, and can be used in a similar way. Superconducting magnets is yet another way.

I heard or read somewhere about someone who created a 'monopole' magnet. He also said it could be used to levitate and object at any distance even if it is not a magnetizable object. This struck me as odd at first but quite profound. I remember learning in college physics that this was an impossibility in the same vein as the trapping of a photon. Does the conceiveability of a concept prove its possibility provided it is conceived correctly?
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