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CruisingRam
I was discusing some political thing at work on the night shift, and one person reading some of the threads I had up said "I bet most of those folks wouldn't know how to rebuild a carb or frame a house, the only types you will find on that site is those that can fix computers"- and then I quipped back that I am on here all the time and I was more mechanically inclined than our own maintainence department LOL

I build motorcycles, do my own remodelling and building, can do everything from frame a house to apply texture to walls to replace a roof- basically everything home related, I also build hot rods, race cars, street cars etc- in fact, I was pointed to this site off of a car site LOL

So how mechanically inclined are you? Can you fix things, perhaps anything BUT computers? LOL
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lordhelmet
QUOTE(CruisingRam @ May 23 2005, 06:46 PM)

I was discusing some political thing at work on the night shift, and one person reading some of the threads I had up said "I bet most of those folks wouldn't know how to rebuild a carb or frame a house, the only types you will find on that site is those that can fix computers"- and then I quipped back that I am on here all the time and I was more mechanically inclined than our own maintainence department LOL

I build motorcycles, do my own remodelling and building, can do everything from frame a house to apply texture to walls to replace a roof- basically everything home related, I also build hot rods, race cars, street cars etc- in fact, I was pointed to this site off of a car site LOL

So how mechanically inclined are you? Can you fix things, perhaps anything BUT computers? LOL
*




As Clint Eastwood said in a famous movie line, "A man has got to know his limitations"...

I have finished two basements; one fully and my current one to the rough-in/wiring/hang drywall stage. I paid a professional to do the seam work, trim, and all the "stuff" the people actually see. Oh, and plumbing and tile shower. I won't touch copper pipe with a 10 foot pole since a leak can ruin a house but I have no problem pulling wire and hooking up outlets, switches, light fixtures, etc.

I've got most of the power tools and will usually be included to do it myself rather than hire someone for "fix it" jobs. Oh, and I have indulged in the hobby of building my own loudspeakers for my home stereo/theater and built a few subs for people.

I'm a person with an engineering degree (and a male) who could care less about cars. To me, they are a pain if you have to work on them so I don't. My first car was a Chevy Chevette and I had to rebuild parts of the engine twice so I lost any taste for the "fun" associated with mechanical car repairs. Dirty work that cuts you up pretty bad was my experience.

Computers? Outside of reseating boards, checking cables and that sort of simple stuff, no way.

At the moment, my garage door opener is on the fritz. I spent all day Sunday screwing around with it but it's still binding in a few spots. Perhaps if I was more mechanically inclined, I would have figured it out by now. But, I'm stumped and about to hire someone to just come out and fix the darn thing.

I guess that makes me average or slightly above average in that regard.
Erasmussimo
I have torn down and rebuilt motorcycles from the ground up. I've torn down and rebuilt old VW engines, but none of the modern stuff. I have built a wooden footbridge of span 16 feet, and a covered wooden automobile bridge of span 32 feet. I have built domestic water supply systems using water from a well, and am currently computerizing the controls on another. I have built computer systems from the processor up. I run a tractor on my land with a brush-hog. I fell trees with my chainsaw, cut them up, and burn the firewood. I can drop a conifer precisely but I'm still pretty bad with oaks. I've laid hundreds of feet of fencing, including barbed-wire, field fence, and wooden. I've also done plenty of wiring. I've cast a bronze sword in my homemade blast furnace, then ground and polished it to final shape. I've made plenty of fancy knife handles, but I've never worked with steel. I have built and flown model airplanes. My current dream project is "Lurch", a 20 foot geodesic sphere built out of PVC and equipped with solar cells and a central computer that permits it to move slowly by adjusting weights. I just want it to wander around my land. It's still pretty far in the future, though.
Lesly
I can burn water.

1. Fill pot with water
2. Place pot on burner
3. Turn knob right

I can even assemble computer desks when the IKEA nesting instinct compels me to make a 2 hour trip. happy.gif
DaytonRocker
I'm a controls engineer (electrical, pneumatic, and hydraulic) engineer and a software developer (C++, Visual Basic). Most of my engineering work has been on automated and robotic manufacturing equipment (there's a point in here somewhere) where both disciplines are required.

Unfortunately, I grew up poor and could not go to college. Instead, I joined the Marines and was taught basic electricity and electronics. After the service, I got a job as a maintenance mechanic and repaired machines. I did that for about 10 years and while doing so, learned how to design them at night when I got home from work. Finally, I got into engineering and left my toolbox days behind me.

I can design complicated robotic systems and write fairly complex C++ code (SQL, multi-threaded, bound data, etc). I can weld, operate machine shop equipment (lathes, boring mills, grinders, bridgeports), and yes, rebuild a motor.

I got hired away by a small business a couple months ago and am back to more "hands-on" work and quite frankly, I'm liking it. I've been a deskjock so long now, I forgot what it was like to get my hands dirty. But the company is so small, that when we have a ton of machines we have to build and get out the door, everyone - including the president - jumps in to help out.

But I have one major weakness (besides highly intelligent and good looking women) - I suck at wood. I mean, really REALLY suck at it. My suckage knows no bounds. It has no limits. I couldn't buy two pieces of wood cut to length and get them to fit together right. My house is on the neighborhood "No Wood Glue" watch.

But most everything else, I have a knack for.
Christopher
I can weld sorta. I need to practice a bit more before I actually try my hand at building my own hardtail frame for a chopper. I can rebuild engines but am a HORRIBLE car mechanic. Woodworking is a skill I am attempting to gain a decent measure of skill with and have plans with my father in law to build cradles for sale--both for actual babies and for dolls as well. I also want to start making my own furniture--mostly because I am cheap and think prices are outrageous.--but also because I find 99% of designs completely lacking in passion.
I am trying to also figure out robotics--from the building to the proramming. I hope it becomes a father son kind of thing. My skill with lathes and such is passable for an amatuer. I have learned how to do the electrics for homes and such.

I mess with all kinds of hobby projects. I live near a lake and want to make 2 small boats with air powered water cannons for pirate battles on the lake. For the kids of course. wub.gif
NiteGuy
Mechanically inclined? Me? whistling.gif

I can build a computer from scratch and have an OS loaded on it in about half an hour. In the dark. With my eyes closed.

I've done a little electrical work, like pulling wire, installing switches, and putting in a ceiling fan.

Anything past your average oil and air filter change is well beyond my ken, automotively speaking. I have a neighbor that does his own brake work, engine work, etc. I, however, want to get to work in one piece.

The same with woodworking. If you gave me every wood tool known to mankind, and told me to build a table, it'd end up being a piece of wood lying on the floor, and I'd most likely be lying in the emergency room with various cuts and contusions. Or, if there were legs attached, I guarantee you the table wouldn't be level.

I have put together a couple of grandfather clock kits for the family, but fortunately for me, all of the parts are already cut, and all I need to do is glue or nail them together, attach the faceplate to the clock works, install the winding chains, and stain it.
slim
I build computers, but can also do some car work. Woodworking is a skill that I do not possess, much like music. I have replaced flywheels, oil pumps, done brakes (all on my own truck), but do not consider myself to be a mechanic by any stretch of the imagination. I'm kind of a jack of all trades and master of none. I can fix most things on my car and around the house, but I am not good enough at any of them to charge a fee for my services.
Curmudgeon
So how mechanically inclined are you?

I made my living with my hands for 30 years and I held journeyman cards as an electrician, and as an instrument man.

In our last house, I sketched out the design that I wanted for our fireplace, and helped the masons build it. When we sold he house, the purchaser wrote into the purchase offer that the fireplace had to stay with the house.

I never learned enough about automobiles that I wanted to do my own maintenance work. I wanted the accelerator to work every time, the brakes to work every time, etc. It has always seemed a safety issue to me to hire the work done. My ex-wife always wanted me to grease the brakes when they started to squeak. Never working on my own cars reduced the temptation to do that, and provided me with an alibi if she ever found a mechanic willing to do that.

At one point, I knew how to solder copper piping, thread galvanized pipes, glue PVC pipes, solder and de-solder electronic circuits, troubleshoot automated systems, Meg motors, and I was considered an expert on the National Electric Code by co-workers and electrical inspectors.

I have had a number of brain seizures, and I forget more with each seizure. The last outlet I wired from scratch took me three years. Last Father's Day, I purchased an external hard drive kit for my computer. I have yet to decipher the manual, and I used to read manuals for a living.

I am currently relearning the craft of working with stained glass.
hayleyanne
QUOTE(Lesly @ May 23 2005, 09:27 PM)
I can burn water.

1. Fill pot with water
2. Place pot on burner
3. Turn knob right

I can even assemble computer desks when the IKEA nesting instinct compels me to make a 2 hour trip. happy.gif
*



I am with you lesly. cool.gif It is funny-- I am usually a multi-tasker par excellence. But when it comes to cooking-- I am not. I have to actually focus or I can, well, burn water . . .

I am also mechanically retarded. I cannot understand directions that come with anything that requires assembling, it is like a foreign language to me.

BTW: I am with you on the whole IKEA thing. When I lived in Alexandria, VA, it was really cool because IKEA was like a half hour away. I am excited though, I have heard that an IKEA is coming to Michigan soon.
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overlandsailor

I am an alarm Tech by trade. I used to primarily install systems in small businesses, though I have worked on everything from homes to Chase Manhattan Banks. Now, my job title is focused on homes, though I have worked more large commercial and Industrial jobs then residential.

I was an Electricians-mate in the active duty navy, and later a construction electrician in the navy reserves.

I have rehabbed a my home including a full kitchen remodel, replacing the feed and drain plumbing from the street in, and upgraded the wiring from the meter in. I have done an assortment of electrical and home improvement projects for neighbors and family, and I am currently rewiring a house my mother purchased, from the pole in.

I have been messing with computers since the Commodore Vic-20 was the cutting edge, and I have a knack for finding and fixing problems on them.

As for the mechanical, I have the ability to figure out how things work, and repairing or making them work better when ic comes to engineering, but I am completely inept when it comes to cars. I was able to apply my carpentry skills to make the bed of my new work truck more functional with slide out shelving and the like, but I would have no idea how to change the oil in it, and no desire to learn. I simply can't stand working on cars, though I tend to have a bit of envy for those who can restore classics. hmmm.gif
Amlord
I'm a mechanical engineer.

My job is fairly hands on at times, involving rebuilding and troubleshooting high pressure pumps and related equipment. The equipment I design frequently has electric and electronic controls on it, and I do a majority of the wiring and troubleshooting there as well.

For whatever reason, I've never been too interested in cars. I am certain that I could do whatever needed to be done, I just don't have the facilities or the tools to do it right. Beyond simple brake work and other minor jobs, I haven't done much to any of the cars I've owned.

Since when did cooking qualify as "mechanically inclined"? tongue.gif
logophage
I've done some moderate carpentry work, poured concrete, run electrical and network wiring and even repaired cars. When I have the time (and inclination), I enjoy a good landscaping project: built a retaining wall as well as a patio using concrete pavers in the backyard. At this point in my life, I try to avoid any unnecessary "tech support" with desktop computers. Been there; done that. However, as an electrical engineer, I've designed, built and programmed custom embedded computer systems which is kinda fun.
ralou
I can burn water, too. I often do. The microwave is my friend! I can't sew for anything, but I can crochet and make chainmail. Yeah, I know, that last one is not the most useful skills to have, since we aren't living in the 14th century, and anyway, making it back then required a forge and more strength than I have. More useless skills I've picked up: I can build a decent cookfire even in the rain, and make a decent lean-to shelter (of the summer-time, staying for a few days variety, not the winter-proof kind). I can catch fish and shoot, too (but I'm a vegetarian, so I don't, and I'm not sure I could hit a target that was moving anyway).

I'm not half bad at installing computer drives, RAM, and etc. (not half good at it, either, and not really wanting to tackle a motherboard installation, although I think I probably could). I can change a tire, and could change my oil but I think it's worth the eighteen bucks to pay someone else to do it. I usually change my own air filter, fuses, headlights, and tailights, though. Sometimes I can get the cable box to let me have the TV back after someone has been playing video games and left it with that black screen, but that one requires a lot of cussing and some button pressing! dry.gif

Hobbes
So how mechanically inclined are you? Can you fix things, perhaps anything BUT computers? LOL

Wow...we've got a regular construction company here on this site! I noticed mainly engineers that replied...so guess I shouldn't be surprised.

For myself, I used to work on cars a lot more than I do know. Lack of time and facilities, mainly. I've rebuilt a couple of motors and taken a tranny out...and still perform numerous other repairs. It's just easier lately to let someone more knowledgeable to it. My most recent repair was putting the belts back on my Mazda (it had thrown them on the way home some months ago). Got one on no problem....but couldn't find the adjustment to loosen the water pump for the other, despite numerous tries and several layers of skin donated to the cause. Finally just took it to a mechanic, who I'm sure fixed it in 5 minutes. Why do all you engineers so delight in designing things to capture the most skin possible when performing any maintenance work? I remember changing the plugs in my Camaro. 6 of them came out pretty easily...the other two required a specially manufactured tool, and a couple hours of effort. Swore several times I was going to drive the dang thing to Detroit, and demand that the designers come down to the parking lot and change the *&%! plugs. Took it into the shop once...but ended up having to do it myself anyway, as they had jammed the gaps on both plugs when putting them it, and were clearly too po'd by that time to care about doing it right.

For wood work...I love working with wood, but have no tools or experience. I guess I'm a closet carpenter. I did spend a few weeks one summer on a construction crew...and have helped make a couple of concrete patios. I find I can actually do this kind of work without cussing up a blue streak whistling.gif ....maybe because you engineers haven't had a chance to screw up the design to where normal people can no longer work on it?

(FWIW....when it comes to engineers, I are one...so please taking the ribbing as intended smile.gif )
Amlord
QUOTE(Hobbes @ May 24 2005, 03:20 PM)
Why do all you engineers so delight in designing things to capture the most skin possible when performing any maintenance work?


We get paid extra for that....it's called a "feature". laugh.gif

Seriously, I wouldn't doubt that automotive guys must take into account the dealership repair business when designing cars...
Wertz
When it comes to cars, I can't do much more than change a tire, checks the fluids, and replace a battery. On the other hand, years of work in theater and television have given me a lot of hands-on experience with carpentry, painting, electrics, and even sewing. I wouldn't be a master craftsman by any means, but I've helped build quite a few sets, hung and focused a lot of lights, done loads of painting and dressing, and constructed quite a few costumes (and have designed tons of all of the above) - plus, as an amateur, I've built a fair amount of furniture, hung a few doors and shelves, and have done a lot of painting, decorating, and other household DIY stuff.

While I'm reasonably proficient in a number of computer applications, I'm generally at a loss when it comes to any type of programming - and keep me well away from hardware. So, while I couldn't rebuild a carb or frame a house (without a lot of help), I couldn't exactly fix a computer either. Overall, though, I'd probably lean more toward the carb and frame side of things. happy.gif
CruisingRam
Don't sell yourself short if you are good set builder Wertz- some of the best carpenters I have ever worked with started doing that first- they don't think like laborers who became carpenters and are usually far better at problem solving when building new construction.
Izdaari
I'm a PC tech on the side, soon to be certified, and then maybe I'll make it my primary business. I'm not especially handy otherwise, though I can do simple auto maintenance, stuff like changing oil and spark plugs. I have little experience doing household work, though I can use tools and follow instructions if they're clearly written and don't assume too much.
GodlessUSSoldier
QUOTE(CruisingRam @ May 23 2005, 05:46 PM)
I was discusing some political thing at work on the night shift, and one person reading some of the threads I had up said "I bet most of those folks wouldn't know how to rebuild a carb or frame a house, the only types you will find on that site is those that can fix computers"- and then I quipped back that I am on here all the time and I was more mechanically inclined than our own maintainence department LOL

I build motorcycles, do my own remodelling and building, can do everything from frame a house to apply texture to walls to replace a roof- basically everything home related, I also build hot rods, race cars, street cars etc- in fact, I was pointed to this site off of a car site LOL

So how mechanically inclined are you? Can you fix things, perhaps anything BUT computers? LOL
*



Aside from being actively aware of politics, I am an Aircraft Structural Repairer in the US Army. I do all minor to moderate difficulty repairs around the house, and am shortly going to begin turning my 2000 Chevy Metro hatchback into a convertible. Here is a patch I installed on a "Chinook" in Afghanistan... (Note the entirely coincidental resemblance to the reclining-nude cut-outs from truckers' mud-flaps.)

user posted image

[I][B]
CruisingRam
I am dating myself a bit here GodlessUssoldier- but I was trained at fort Useless on the Chinook after the skycrane was discontinued- my first MOS in the Army was 67 November, which was Huey mechanic, switched to heavy lift later.

So you still wear alot of hydraulic fluid in those things?
doomed_planet
QUOTE(Amlord @ May 24 2005, 08:23 AM)
I'm a mechanical engineer.


I'm a domestic engineer. In laymen's terms that would be "housewife." w00t.gif
I can troubleshoot just about any laundry situtation, with a cupful of bleach
and some hot water. online2long.gif

QUOTE(CruisingRam @ May 23 2005, 03:46 PM)
So how mechanically inclined are you? Can you fix things, perhaps anything
BUT computers?



As far as fixing things goes, I rely almost completely on my husband. He
handles all the required maintenance on my car and pretty much takes care
of anything around the house, whether it be mechanical or electrical.

Who knows if it's a cultural thing, or something that is innate, but whatever
the case, it seems that guys tend to be better at "fixin" things. wink.gif




GodlessUSSoldier
QUOTE(CruisingRam @ May 28 2005, 08:25 PM)
So you still wear alot of hydraulic fluid in those things?
*



If she stops leaking, LAND NOW!!!! laugh.gif
AuthorMusician
So how mechanically inclined are you? Can you fix things, perhaps anything BUT computers? LOL

Actually, I'm pretty good with both computers and cars/motorcycles. Back in high school, auto mechanics was the only subject that I aced all the way through. That was because I had to do a valve job on my 1956 Chrysler, and subsequently, a complete overhaul. The added compression ate a rod bearing.

Today I just do minor things like oil changes because it is ultimately cheaper to have the other stuff done by reputable mechanics. They've got all the cool tools that I don't want to buy (again), and I do have the ability to spot the shysters out there.

Got the same attitude about house projects. Oh, I'll install a light but not a ceiling fan, deck, or restain the house. That's for younger men, and they have the right tools as well. Getting better at spotting the home improvement shysters.

I will do more major things with motorcycle just because the thing is small and relatively clean -- it is a dual sport, so dirt is okay on the surface. Hardly ever wash that ugly old Kaw, but it still gets me around the hills. Hey, it just had a 10th birthday!

Troubleshooting large servers is what I do for major income, and that means troubleshooting PCs is almost child's play. From disk crashes to motherboard replacements, I've done it all. These days it's easier sometimes just to replace the whole box. That's where my rock-solid backup schemes help a lot: external USB hard drive backup media and multiple system disks mounted in trays that allow quick swap-outs, and of course multiple systems period.

There was one IBM PS2 box that had a broken memory stick holder, and I propped up the stick with a chunk of cardboard between the power supply and stick slot. The machine was still working when it got decommissioned. When you travel a lot on motorcycles, you learn how to improvise.

One lasting dream is to have a garage with overhead lift and benches for restoring old motorcycles. Eh, I doubt that will ever come about. That one is in the same league as wanting an old Plymouth Barracuda with a big hemi gas-slurping powerhouse. Guess I'm getting older due to the practical desire of wanting a hybrid SUV, probably Toyota, down the road. If Ford comes out with something similar -- or even hydrogen internal combustion -- I'm a potential customer.
Wertz
AuthorMusician: I trust that your "that's for younger men, they have the right tools" philosophy doesn't apply to every aspect of your life. There's much to be said for knowing how to use one's tools. laugh.gif


AuthorMusician
QUOTE(Wertz @ May 29 2005, 11:51 AM)
AuthorMusician: I trust that your "that's for younger men, they have the right tools" philosophy doesn't apply to every aspect of your life. There's much to be said for knowing how to use one's tools.  laugh.gif
*



laugh.gif

Let's just say that every tool that I have at hand, I know how to use at a highly experienced expert level, except maybe the reciprocating power saw. Can't seem to keep it in the slot when doing metal, and that breaks the blade.

A truly horrific experience tongue.gif

You should have been here when the four guys, 20s and 30s, ripped out the back deck with chain saws. Hooting and hollering, and going, "Hey, sorry man, the must have hurt!"

It's just not the proper sport for a fifty-something guy.
nebraska29
QUOTE
So how mechanically inclined are you? Can you fix things, perhaps anything BUT computers? LOL


The wife does the caulking around the windows, fixes the car, and handles constructing our children's toys. I only come into play when she needs to know a historical tidbit for her ladie's website. thumbsup.gif I did take industrial arts in high school, but didn't find it interesting at all.

The only "mechanical know-how" that I have done is line one of my most expensive cigar boxes with felt so as to make a "keep-sake" for the 'ol wife. I do plan on constructing my own humidor some time, though I don't have the time do dabble in that right now. sad.gif
Vyshtia
I race motorcycles and so I own 6. I work on my own bikes and can do everything on my own down to the valve adjustments. Haven't been deeper than that. My commuter has 96,000 miles on it and will either need an engine rebuild or I'll swap out the engine...I'll get more mechanical experience once I get going with that project smile.gif
CruisingRam
QUOTE(AuthorMusician @ May 29 2005, 07:40 AM)
So how mechanically inclined are you? Can you fix things, perhaps anything BUT computers? LOL

One lasting dream is to have a garage with overhead lift and benches for restoring old motorcycles. Eh, I doubt that will ever come about. That one is in the same league as wanting an old Plymouth Barracuda with a big hemi gas-slurping powerhouse.
*




Hmmm- I now have four bikes: 2 (two) 1985 V65 Sabres, one a sport tourer (think racy goldwing) the other a street fighter in progress. Hope to be able to hunt Haybusa's with it LOL- a 1975 Z1 B900 Kawasaki modified street fighter, and a 1975 B 900 in progress as a chopper. I also have the 1967 Valiant race car you see in my Avatar, and a 1969 Coronet R/T six pack (clone, not original)

I love my machines, play with my toys! LOL

In actuality though, my Cummins Ram and my Sabre (the sport tourer) get the most use. Me and the wife went up to Denali park yesterday in it, a 600 mile round trip with our side stops and acting like tourists LOL
DaffyGrl
So how mechanically inclined are you? Can you fix things, perhaps anything BUT computers? LOL

I used to be able to do some minor maintenance on cars (back when engines were simple), but not newer cars with all the computerized gizmos. I'm fairly handy around the house (I have to be laugh.gif ) and have a pretty decent collection of hand and power tools <insert Tim Taylor-style grunts here>. I'm better at putting stuff together or building stuff than fixing stuff. I'm not afraid to getty dirty, sweaty or greasy. I absolutely won't work with electrical stuff (just a phobia of mine) though. Oh, and roofs...don't like roofs.
Curmudgeon
So how mechanically inclined are you? Can you fix things, perhaps anything BUT computers?

I really can't fix computers...

I finally got last year’s Father’s Day present, an external hard drive, working a couple of week’s ago. In the end, my computer wouldn’t recognize it until it was formatted. PE’s computer recognized that it wasn’t formatted, formatted it, and then my computer recognized it.

I’m trying out a new toy that I got for this Father’s day, a second monitor for my computer. So far, it has some idiosyncrasies, but… I installed a higher powered video driver a couple years back because a program that I wanted to run wouldn’t run without it. Ever since, the computer has shut down occasionally because the second monitor’s “driver had failed.” (There was no second monitor.)

One of my favorite tricks is to compose off line, in MS-Word, and then copy to e-mail or America’s Debate. Then, I don’t have to stop and spell check separately, and if it tells me that I have timed out when I click “preview post,” I still have my carefully composed post.
Juber3
I can fix little things with alot of work. For example if my computer was over heating i would put a fan in front of it while it was outside, hopefully working when i bring it back in. Or if my scanner is broken id look inside it take out a frew gadgets and hope it works. In the end its just a paper jam tongue.gif.

I can also fix broken hearts with many people telling me that im a good person to talk to ( i wanna be a psychologist when i grow up).
Momof3
I can turn on the TV with the remote control. I can start my car with the key.
If for some reason there is a problem I am SOL.
Computer have a problem??? MIKE HELP!!!!
If the power goes out I can't reset the VCR. That thing will flash the time till I am dead.
That's why I had kids. tongue.gif
FargoUT
I can tighten the screws on my glasses, and I can fill my car's gas tank. I can change a flat tire. I can change the oil if I really need to (generally, I prefer taking it in somewhere, cause I'm lazy). I built my own computer, although I have no idea how to fix it (I recently had a hard drive crash due to user error).

But sadly, I'm a big computer geek. Actually, I'm more of a video game geek. I really don't do much fixing. I'm usually afraid of screwing it up and botching the job.
La Herring Rouge
I can pour concrete, frame a building, build furniture, fix a mechanical pencil, I built the computer I am presently using..

I repaired my first radio (it fell down the stairs) when I was 9 although I had many other failures with electrical equipment prior to that. When I was 12 I used the parts form 4 small "Stomper" toy cars and made one mega-stomper. ( I still have the unused parts in a cigar box 21 years later because you never know...)

I can't fix modern cars because they have made it nearly impossible....

I can re-seal a bathtub (but I just haven't gotten around to doing it).

I can fix the knob on my toilet so the water doesn't run constantly.

I built a cat tree for my three cats for 1/4 the cost of something not nearly as cool from the pet store.

I recently built shelves in my computer room to house all my books.

I am dumbfounded by the directions of the "easy to install" shelving unit my mother bought.

I can use chopsticks!

I can take apart my keyboard to clean the junk out of it and yet I cannot type to save my life.

I think I can make just about anything given the right tools, materials and, or course, lots of free time.
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